LECTURES

Lectures are categorized by industry focus (i.e. Humanities & Social Sciences, Sustainability, Science & Innovation, Coffee Farming & Processing, Roasting & Retailing, Trading & Commerce)

Translation Available: To access the translation service, you can pick up a rental headset prior to attending the lecture.  Headsets will be available in the TCC and require a photo ID.


HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES

FRIDAY, APRIL 20

Making Specialty Coffee Work for Women - Collaborative Incubator Models to Help Specialty Coffee Farmers Reach Their Full Potential

As specialty coffee markets develop, opportunities are opening up for small farmers to sell excellent coffees at higher prices. To capitalize on these opportunities, entrepreneur-minded farmers need help closing critical knowledge, network and funding gaps. This panel discusses the promise and challenges for this new breed of programming through the lens of Grounds for Empowerment. GFE – being developed out of Emory University – is a multi-year incubator program that helps women specialty coffee farmers transform promising coffee farms into prosperous small businesses. It identifies promising women coffee farmers in Nicaragua, and builds a network of advisors, supporters and potential customers. While making these connections, GFE provides training on topics like storytelling, social media, and relationship management.

As GFE confronts gaps that stop farmers from reaching their full potential, we recruit partners to help close them. So far, we have found roles for universities (Emory), cooperatives (PRODECOOP), roasters (i.e. Vega and Counter Culture) and supply chain supporters (i.e. Link2Origin). This panel convenes these partners to discuss the importance of collaborative, multi-stakeholder programs that cultivate economic opportunities for farmers. This will help us build a network of incubator programs that connect women farmers from different countries to specialty markets across North America.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Chelan 2

Target Audience: CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers, R - Roasters, T - Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Emily Davis, Education Manager, Counter Culture Coffee | More Presenters Coming Soon!

Moderator: Coming Soon

Translation Available: English to Spanish

Mentorship in Specialty Coffee: Students Become the Teachers

One of the "special" things about specialty coffee is the connections that coffee people make with one another—beyond simply making deals, beyond simply hiring and firing, we are an industry of people who are drawn to share, learn, and grow with one another. Mentorship is one of the most powerful professional tools in that regard, and something that sets the specialty apart from the commercial: It also, however, comes with great responsibility, and sometimes even risks. This focused discussion between a few of specialty coffee’s biggest boosters will explore how to create these relationships, how they can be mutually beneficial, and how to prevent them from doing more harm than good.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Yakima 1

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas

Presenter(s): Katie Carguilo, Coffee Buyer and Quality Analyst, Counter Culture Coffee| Lem Butler, Business Owner/ 2016 United States Barista Champion, Black & White Coffee Roasters, LLC| Nocholas Cho, co-CEO & Head Barista, Wrecking Ball Coffee Roasters| Mansi Chokshi, North America Experience Director, Specialty Coffee Association

Moderator: Meister

SATURDAY, APRIL 21

How the Coffee Industry Can Make Successful Refugee Resettlement Possible

It goes without question that the U.S. is currently locked in a very public debate over what type of country we want to be for refugees. The U.S. has a long tradition of welcoming refugees, but is at a crossroads of what that will look like in the future. The coffee industry is uniquely positioned as a major influencer in American society that can create structures to both welcome refugees and promote their acceptance in our local communities. As coffee companies and their customers increasingly demand that humanity is valued across the entire supply chain, integrating recently arrived refugees in our businesses is another way we can continue our global impact here in the U.S. Though our intentions may be in the right place, the realities of running a costumer-facing, profitable business can raise questions on the realities to take part in this mission. This presentation is a safe-space conversation that provides attendees with practical information on how to hire and work with refugees in their community and the allows the opportunity to ask hard questions. Presenters include refugees working in the coffee industry, coffee/café employers, and 1951 Coffee staff so that attendees can hear from multiple perspectives.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 3

Target Audience: RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, R - Roasters, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

Moderator: Rachel Taber

Development from the Bottom-Up: Speaking the Language of Sustainability Across Cultures and Contexts to Improve Your Specialty Coffee Business

Straddling the humanities and sustainability, panelists will discuss how understanding culture and context improves approaches to sustainability. Drawing on experiences in Vietnam, Mexico, and beyond, they will describe setbacks arising when producers and buyers speak different languages of sustainability, data collection is incomplete, and development “top-down.” Dr. Sarah Grant will discuss her research in Vietnam, where producers understand and define sustainability distinctly from specialty buyers, highlighting the possibility of quality improvement through improved cultural commensurability. Summer Lewis and José Luis Zarate from True Roots will draw on work in Mexico to argue that the industry hampers its ultimate objectives when the local context is misunderstood. Dr. Kate Fischer will share her research in Honduras with Catracha Coffee, showing that improvements in post-harvest processing are found when we trust the local context to answer our questions. Nora Burkey from The Chain Collaborative will speak about whether coffee provides an opportunity or bleak future for smallholder farmers, indicating that the answer doesn’t lie with end-market research but with farming communities. Panelists will share tips to guide industry actors to think about sustainability differently, ending with steps for how companies can approach system change, improve their business, and create a stronger specialty coffee future.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Yakima 1

Target Audience: R - Roasters, P - Producers, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): José Luis Zárate, International Development Consultant & Trainer, True Roots International| Kate Fischer, Instructor in Anthropology and Women & Gender Studies, University of Colorado-Boulder| Sarah Grant, Assistant Professor - Cultural Anthropology, California State University, Fullerton| Nora Burkey, Executive Director, The Chain Collaborative

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

LGBTQIA Basics

One of the greatest challenges that arises when addressing gender & orientation as part of an organization’s diversity strategy is simple knowledge - basic education. Words that meant one thing 5 years ago (or even last year), now mean something completely different. The alphabet soup that is LGBTQIA…… is confusing at best, and it can become incredibly bewildering when and if you are launched into a conversation with co-workers, employees, customers, or colleagues. No one wants to ask questions that might be taken as offensive, and yet they are afraid that someone will be offended if they don’t ask. It’s a conundrum, and rather than say the wrong thing, many will simply not say anything at all.

LGBTQIA Basics is a lecture that provides a foundation of knowledge on gender and orientation for those who want to be supportive allies, for those who want to champion diversity in their organizations, and for those who want to be asking the right questions - but aren’t sure where to start. The presentation covers definitions, concepts, examples, dos and don’ts, as well as offering a forum for questions. The first step can be the hardest, but it is often the one most worth taking.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Yakima 1

Target Audience: B - Baristas, R - Roasters, P - Producers, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Ellery Evren Notte, Founder & CEO, Learn the Landscape

SUSTAINABILITY

friday, april 20

The Carbon Footprint of Coffee: Mitigation Strategies for Roasters

Certifications often concentrate on sustainability issues at the farm level, yet research points to carbon emissions being highest at the consumption level. The SCA has recognized these concerns by specifically recommending the purchase of carbon offsets to help mitigate impacts of climate change. Recognizing these actions, the lecture will explore how carbon emissions throughout coffee supply chain are measured and sequestered through the management of carbon projects, specifically in relation to coffee producing landscapes. Further discussion will explore accessible solutions for roasters and cafes to invest in voluntary carbon credits which can provide opportunities for those living within coffee producing areas to seek additional revenue and market differentiation by participating in reforestation and afforestation carbon projects.

The presentation will include following panelists; Étienne Desmarais, President of ECOTIERRA, a carbon project developer with operations in Jaen, Peru, Meredith Taylor, Sustainability Manager at Counter Culture Coffee and Caleb Nichols, Co-Owner of Kickapoo Coffee, where both roasting companies have incorporated carbon sequestration projects into their company sustainability goals. Moderator and Panelist Jon Ferguson of the Arbor Day Foundation will present strategies for roasters and cafes to participate in offsetting the carbon footprint of roasted coffee inventories and affiliated products.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 4

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T - Traders

Presenter(s): Caleb Nicholes, Director of Coffee/Owner, Kickapoo Coffee Roasters| Meredith Taylor. Sustainability Manager, Counter Culture Coffee| Etienne Desmarais, CEO, ECOTIERRA| Jon Ferguson, Coffee Quality Specialist, Arbor Day Foundation


Farmworkers Pilot in Colombia: A collaborative approach to improve farmworkers well-being

Labor is a key factor for the success and viability of the coffee industry, yet farms are currently struggling to recruit and motivate labor due in part to urban migration and low incentives for performing rural work.

Aware of this problem, a group of 9 organizations (RGC Coffee, Aguadas Cooperative, SCA, FTUSA, UTZ, Solidaridad, Fundacion Luicjota, CRECE, Expocafe) decided to joint efforts around the issue in order to implement a pilot project to test mechanisms to attract workforce to coffee farms and to encourage industry participation in joint interventions with producer organizations to improve working conditions in coffee farms.

This panel will share its research and results from the first year of implementation, to see which strategies have been attractive to workers and farmers and how the industry can start to replicate successful strategies. Additionally the panel aims to add a “reflection” about how we can take this work to a larger scale and how we could use these learnings to push for a greater impact beyond the specific project.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 2

Target Audience: CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers, R - Roasters, B - Baristas, T- Traders

Presenter(s): Kim Elena Ionescu, BA, English, Spanish, Latin American Studies, Specialty Coffee Association| Miguel Zamora, Agricultural Engineer, UTZ| Cesar Julio Diaz, Business Administrator, Cooperativas de Caficultores de Agudas| Angela Pelaez, Industrial Engineer, RGC Coffee, Inc.

Translation Available: English to Spanish, Spanish to English

Why Coffee for the Next Generation of Farmers? What is Inspiring Them; What More is Needed?

Coffee production rarely offers a prosperous future for the children of smallholder coffee farmers. Costs of production, increasing climate risks and price volatility mean it largely represents a lot of work for minimal gain – alongside the fact that manual agricultural labour can be seen as old fashioned and out of touch. So, what of the future of coffee production and how do we inspire the next generation of young farmers to participate, both on the farm and in farmer cooperatives? We look at the opportunities presented by increased visibility across the value chain in specialty coffee, knowing where their coffee is sold, opportunities to train and take roles of leadership within the cooperative, to specialise in quality or marketing. What is the role that mobile technologies are playing and what is its potential? What are the key factors for young people in investing their futures in coffee?

We consider why this is such an important area to invest in for industry and how they can become involved. Twin would invite a range of actors to participate in a panel discussion, including: young farmers and/or coop staff from Tanzania & Peru projects; a youth organisation; donor & buyer investing in youth.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 2

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, T - Traders, R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

Translation Available: English to Spanish, Spanish to English

The coffee industry has demonstrated a noteworthy drive toward collaborative engagement in sustainability over the past several years, but there has been a lack of investment in gender equity throughout the value chain. As part of a multi-staged process to spur engagement across the supply chain to increase gender equity, the CQI Partnership for Gender Equity (PGE) developed and piloted a field-level project in Nicaragua in 2017 with funding from UTZ and in partnership with two producer cooperatives, SOPPEXCCA and PRODECOOP.

This panel will highlight how bringing together actors along the supply chain, households, producer organizations, and the end market, helps to create a catalytic effort toward better outcomes for coffee farming families, their communities and the supply chain as a whole. Panelists representing the different levels of the supply chain will speak to their unique role in the process and how participating in the project has begun to shift gender imbalances in their ways of working.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 4

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

Translation Available: English to Spanish, Spanish to English

Saturday, april 21

Resilient Coffee?: What “Resilience” Means & Why This Matters for All Members of Coffee’s Supply Chain

The use of the word "resilience" has exploded in the 21st-century. Originally a term used in psychology and ecology, it's now a concept used in dozens of fields from zoology to geography, and, more recently, in political science and international development. The word is also increasing in usage in specialty coffee. From "resilient seeds" to "resilient farmers," from "resilient communities," to "resilient cities," what do we all mean when we talk about "resilience," and why does this matter? This global panel of interdisciplinary academics and practitioners in specialty coffee will examine the impact that "resilience" thinking has on all members of the coffee chain, with a particular focus on the intersection between "sustainability" and "resilience" as we consider challenges of climate change and gender equity.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Chelan 2

Target Audience: B - Baristas, R - Roasters, P - Producers, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Shadi Atallah, Assistant Professor, University of New Hampshire | Phyllis J. Johnson, President, BD Imports | Vava Angwenyi, Founder & Chief Coffaholic, Vava Coffee Kenya & Gente Del Futuro - Tanzania

Moderator(s): Erika Koss, PhD candidate; Writer, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Laying the Groundwork for a Living Income: Strategies Across the Supply Chain

Research has shown that producing higher quality coffee – and more of it – does not necessarily result in better incomes for coffee farmers. The future of specialty coffee relies on ensuring that farmers and their families can not only survive, but thrive. Sustainability in coffee begins, first and foremost, by appreciating the economic circumstances of those producing it. Learn about several inter-connected perspectives on living income and profitability, and the ways that coffee-farming families – both current and future generations - are understanding and tackling their economic challenges alongside their trading and roaster partners.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 2

Target Audience: R - Roasters, P - Producers, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): TJ Semanchin, Owner, Kickapoo Coffee | Victor Gerencia, Manager, Red Ecolsierra | Peter W. Roberts, Academic Director, Transparent Trade Coffee & Grounds for Empowerment, Emory University

Moderator(s): Alina Amador

Converting Climate Change Information into Action: Decision-making tools and resources for moving forward with successful adaptation projects

This presentation will address two of the most common hurdles in developing climate change adaptation projects: 1) Choosing which adaptation solution(s) to implement and 2) Finding the informational resources for successful implementation of a chosen solution(s).

Climate change impacts coffee farmers differently around the world, therefore solutions must be tailored to the unique conditions of each location. The first part of the lecture will discuss how using participatory action research (PAR) methodology can help create adaptation strategies that are impactful, feasible, location-specific, create buy-in from the outset, and strengthen value chain partnerships.

The second part of the presentation addresses hurdle #2: how to sort through the myriad of climate change-related information to find resources relevant to implementing PAR-generated adaptation solutions. The existing pool of information holds so much value—from scientific research about current and predicted changes in the climate itself, to best practices lists, technical knowledge, and valuable case studies—but that value is not realized when the resources are difficult to find and use in real-world applications. Presenters from the SCA Sustainability Center’s climate change working group and HRNS’s initiative for coffee&climate project will discuss the ways the public tools they are creating address this challenge.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Chelan 4

Target Audience: R - Roasters, P - Producers, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Meredith Taylor, Sustainability Manager, Counter Culture Coffee | Molly Laverty, Director of Sustainability, Farmer Bros. Co.

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Sustainability But Were Afraid to Ask

For many members of the specialty coffee industry, the rise of sustainability is equal parts exciting and intimidating. Every opportunity raises questions, for example: is it more important for a company dedicated to sustainability to green its own operations or invest in coffee-producing communities? Must coffees be third-party certified to be sustainable? How does an organization know if it's having a positive impact? What are the obstacles to collaboration and who is successfully overcoming those obstacles? During this session, COSA's Daniele Giovannucci and SCA's Kim Elena Ionescu will interview one another about their experiences with successful sustainability initiatives in the coffee sector and beyond. In addition to talking to each other, the speakers will encourage members to volunteer their questions and welcome all sorts (and especially those persistent, simple-seeming ones that turn out to be anything but simple when it comes to finding answers).

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 5

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

The Social Inclusion as a Value Generator for the Coffee Industry

The coffee business is a labor intensive activity involving a large and diverse group of people, from farmworkers, passing to farmers and finishing with baristas, tens of millions of people with dreams, weaknesses and stories to tell. To understand their complexity and richness constitutes a big opportunity to create value for all, starting from those who have less opportunities and are the most vulnerable in the industry. This lecture aims to show how the industry can create value for all through a social inclusive approach, presenting examples of real cases of inclusion where communities who have been listened to and taking into account have today sense of future by having some of their long term goals attainable, and at the same time generating value for all the actors in the coffee industry. The lecture will have the perspective from RGC Coffee as importer leader in sustainable coffee projects, FTUSA as promoter of Fair trade and wellbeing for all and SOLIDARIDAD as an organization with over 45 years of experience creating sustainable supply chains from producer to final consumer.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Chelan 2

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, P - Producers, T - Traders

Presenter(s): Colleen Anunu, Masters Degree in International Development, Fair Trade USA | Andrea Olivar, Finance and International Relations, Solidaridad | Angela Pelaez, Industrial Engineer, RGC Coffee

Translation Available: Spanish to English

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

Confronting the Healthcare Inequality Gap: Creating Care Networks for Women Coffee Farmers Using a Scalable Approach Built Upon Natural Connections

For too many people on the production side of coffee's value chain, access to healthcare is fraught with barriers or even beyond reach. What's more, healthcare inequalities in poor, rural areas disproportionately impact women, infants and children. Because 25-million smallholders produce approximately 80% of the world's coffee, and because women perform much of the work, any discussion about building a more inclusive and sustainable specialty coffee community needs to address healthcare, a basic human right.

Bringing together presenters from different segments of the industry, this lecture explores the current state of healthcare for smallholders, from health risks associated with the cultivation and processing of coffee, to barriers accessing healthcare in rural areas, to examining healthcare inequality as an impediment to gender equality. Roasters and retailers eager to make a direct impact in the communities they work with will gain deeper insight into strategies for action, learning about the roles governments, NGO's, universities, and industry professionals play in addressing healthcare inequalities. By highlighting collaborations built upon natural connections across the value chain and existing healthcare networks, the presenters will share their own experience collaborating with University of Washington TREE and Aga Kahn University to provide affordable care using a scalable approach.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 1

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, P - Producers, T - Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Joseph Maurey, Manager, Coffee Roasting & Training, University of Washington Housing & Food Services | Cheryl Kingan, Coffee Buyer, Cafe Grumpy | Chris Davidson, Senior Trader, Atlas Coffee Importers | Michael Chung, Doctor, University of Washington

SCIENCE & INNOVATION

FRIDAY, APRIL 20

A Novel Cupping Competition System: Introducing Transparency and Objectivity

A novel cupping competition system was designed and used in a competition in November, 2017. This lecture will explain the system, review the development process, and share the successes and failures of the system after its debut use.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 1

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, T - Traders

Presenter(s): Shawn Steiman, PhD, Coffee Scientist, Consultant, Entrepreneur, and Author, Daylight Mind Coffee Company

Beyond Heirlooms and Hybrids: Breaking Down the Coffees of Ethiopia and East Africa

World Coffee Research and Counter Culture have both independently been working on better more up-to-date reference guides on the coffee varieties and research that has been done, and currently being done, in Ethiopia and East Africa. Counter Culture will present on a their newly published material, that for the first time consolidates over 50 in-depth descriptions on the varieties of Ethiopia. WCR will present on their newly published African Variety Intelligence Report outlining the varieties and research of coffees from Kenya and other East African countries. This unique collaboration hopes to be for people a much needed missing puzzle piece of information, on some of the most beloved and mis-understood origins in the world.

*A goal of this lecture would be the attendees ideally could walk away with an SCA edition of both brand new reports and variety diagrams. (Printing and support of materials done by Counter Culture Coffee.)

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 1

Target Audience: B - Baristas, P - Producers, T - Traders, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

Moderator(s): Hanna Neuschwander

Build it, Grow it, Make it Work - Innovation at Scale

In December 2014, Starbucks opened the Reserve Roastery and Tasting Room, right up the street from our original store in Seattle, WA. This was the first time in 43 years, Starbucks opened a roasting and manufacturing facility to the public. The 15,00o sq.-ft. location has 2 functioning roasters, a pack line, a full service restaurant, an event space, 5 espresso machines and 2 café environments. Through the vision of Howard Schultz, there are now plans to open 5 more roasteries in ultra-urban settings such as Shanghai and New York. The introduction of this new level of retail and professionalism has forced Starbucks to think in a completely different way. How do you scale an idea with such an enormous level of complexity? How can you continue to innovate while remaining true to your history and heritage? How do you create an experience around coffee on a global scale? Whether it's supply chain, store design or equipment innovation; hear these questions answered. We'll share our successes and our challenges as we face new growing pains within what is now, the 5th wave of coffee.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 3

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters, RO- Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

Food Safety 101 and How it Impacts Coffee

Part I: Introduction to basic food safety principles :what are microbes, why we should be concerned about them, where found, how to control and why they are important in the food and beverage industry.

Part II: How the coffee industry is impacted (or not) by food safety considerations. Highlight of main areas of concern during supply chain and prep methods.

Part III: Key considerations and suggestions for accessing resources to help. (Guidance will be tied in to the forthcoming NCA guidelines for cold brew safety if that is released on schedule during their National meeting in March 2018)

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 5

Target Audience: CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers, RO- Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Dr. Maya Zuniga, Supply Chain Optimization and Technical Expert, S&D Coffee and Tea

Tracking and Tweaking Your Extraction

This work will explore the different chemical and physical markers that characterize espresso extraction. By using TDS, acidity, caffeine and chlorogenic acids extractions of different grinders, machines and brew ratios can be compared to each other. Recent studies in our lab have demonstrated that for a given roasted coffee TDS, as measured by a refractometer, correlates well with the content of a range of components in the coffee brew, such as caffeine, chlorogenic acids and titrable acidity. For the titrable acidity, a very precise correlation to TDS was found for a wide range of extraction yields (13-26%) and two different brewing ratios (4 and 12). In order to better explain the concept of titrable acidity, the relation between water alkalinity, coffee acids and the perceived acidity will be explained. As a further step the same markers will be used track the evolution of the extraction. And finally, we will also show how different extraction conditions impact the relative amounts of the respective markers and ultimately the sensory properties.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 3

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

SATURDAY, APRIL21

Turning Research into “Reach”search! How to Ensure Coffee Genetics Reach Producers

There remain significant global disease challenges facing coffee producers such as coffee leaf rust, coffee borer, and coffee wilt disease. Practices mitigating the impact of these diseases have had varying levels of success and research on disease-resistant varietals has taken years to develop and been slow to reach farmers. As new varietals are being developed, the public and private sector must improve dissemination of information and plant genetics. This panel of researchers and coffee sector specialists will explore the current dissemination efforts and opportunities to improve them. The ability to connect research institutions to commercial nurseries and then to producers is vital, but needs to be geared towards farmer needs. How should the coffee sector develop transformational mechanisms to apply coffee research in a manner that is sustainable and profitable for all actors?

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 1

Target Audience: CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, RO - Retail Operators, T - Traders, P - Producers, R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Curt Reintsma, Senior Partnerships Specialist, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) | Stanley Kuehn, Chief Project Director, NCBA CLUSA International | Dapeng Zhang, Research Geneticist (Dr.), USDA ARS | T.J. Ryan, Technical Managing Director, ACDI/VOCA

Moderator(s): Jocelyn G. Brown, Deputy Administrator - Office of Capacity Building and Development, Foreign Agricultural Service/USDA

The Potential of Controlled Fermentation Through Yeast Inoculation

By bringing together microbiologists working to develop strains of yeast specifically designed for coffee fermentation, and leading coffee producers, we'll dive deep into the ongoing research in coffee processing using selected cultures as well as exploring the analog between scaling microbiological technology in the traditional worlds of wine and coffee. This panel discussion will recount the experiences of Aida Batlle, Rachel Peterson, and Tim Hill in France in October 2017, when they spent a week exploring yeast selection, production, and characterization in an effort to improve global knowledge on the organism, and also get alignment with the application in coffee (timing, preparation, sensory demands, waste streams, etc.). The session will include a tasting of chocolates -- a control sample and two samples inoculated with different yeast strains -- to prove that yeast can bolster taste.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 4

Target Audience: T - Traders, P - Producers, R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

Moderator(s): Sarah Allen

A Scientific Approach to Coffee Freshness

Since the early days of the specialty coffee movement, freshness has been one of its central pillars. It is best defined as having its original unimpaired qualities and is often understood, in coffee, as freshly roasted, ground within a few days, immediately extracted and consumed. In spite of this pivotal role of freshness for high quality coffee, the scientific measurement of freshness has been vague and elusive.

Here, we will outline two approaches. One is based on the degassing of the freshly roasted coffee. We will discuss the link between CO2 content & degassing to freshness, processing and cup quality. The other approach looks into the evolution of the aroma profile during storage. We will introduce a series of freshness index suited to assess the evolution of freshness of roasted coffee during storage. While these ratios have shown to evolve during storage, the speed at which this freshness indices increases/decrease depends on packaging, barrier properties and storage temperature. This has opened the possibility to use both degassing and freshness-indices to assess the freshness of roasted coffee and compare the quality of different packaging materials and storage conditions for preserving the freshness of coffee.

Chahan Yeretzian1, Samo Smrke1, Marco Wellinger1, Sebastian Opitz1, Tomonori Suzuki1,2 1 Zurich University of Applied Science (ZHAW), Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Einsiedlerstrasse 31, 8820 Wädenswil, Switzerland 2 Suntory Beverage & Food Limited, Japan

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 5

Target Audience: B - Baristas, T - Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

Quantum Espresso: The Pursuit of Reproducibility

The production of espresso is a complex science experiment. There are several dependent variables that can be manipulated and may impact the beverage outcome. Sources of these variables include coffee roast and origin, dry mass of coffee, volume of water, tamp force, temperature, water pressure, and several other technical and environmental factors. Inherent variability of any of these variables, combined with the requirement for the beverage to taste ‘good’, makes espresso the most complex preparation method of any of the coffee brewing approaches.

This seminar details our latest research outcomes from the BROHOP (Baristas, Roasters, Other affiliations, Huddersfield, Oregon, Portsmouth) collaboration. In our pursuit of reproducible espresso, we have discovered some unusual phenomena in the process of making espresso, and identified variables that have negligible impact on the physics of the shot. In short, we present a systematic approach to achieving reproducibly tasty espresso, arriving at a recipe through mathematics. Importantly, the outcome of the procedure, i.e. what tastes ‘good’, is 100% determined by the barista, and their preference serves as the end point of our optimization routine.

Using the same algorithm we also demonstrate how a barista can reduce their dry mass dose by up to 25%. If every café in America employed this approach that equates to ~$300,000,000 cost reduction per year in dry coffee mass alone. This reduction comes at no deficit to flavor profile. We expect this work will lay the foundation for future educational programs, as well as generate interesting discussion among the community.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 3

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters , RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

Demystifying, Updating, and Expanding the Brewing Control Chart

Each of us, at some point in our coffee education have been exposed to the coffee brewing control chart. This classic chart was developed in the 1950’s by Ernest Lockhart and colleagues through research at the Coffee Brewing Institute. It displays the relationship between percent extraction and total dissolved solids at a given brewing ratio. Additionally, various acceptability zones were overlaid, describing the expected cup sensory experience with an ideal zone indicated in the middle. Although relevant in its time, this classic chart lacks applicability in the current brewing climate. Given modern brewing techniques, shifting consumer preference, and increased demand for unique coffee, how can we better develop this chart? Current research is underway to explore this question. Through the use of chemical measures, both quantitative and consumer sensory analysis, the classic chart is receiving a revitalization. This lecture will present some of the history and development of the classic chart. Then explore the realm of ongoing research hoping to renovate this icon.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 2

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Scott Frost, PhD, UC Davis Coffee Center

We Know Water is Important, But How Do We Teach It?

The Water Quality Handbook, Water for Coffee, The SCAE Water Report all tell us how important water is for coffee. They all delve deeper into the science of how water impacts coffee. All of us geeks buy the books but then don't know what to do with the info because it is too complicated for the average person. Working with the authors all these three books, and a few others, we have created a document that and presentation for trainers in how to teach water, a 2-3 hour training module on how to teach water to professional level trainers.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 3

Target Audience: CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

FSMA Now Applies To All

FSMA is now being enforce. This Lecture covers Who is affected and went each component will be reinforce. The requirements of the Food Safety Modernization Act. How to prepare your food safety plan that meets the FSMA requirements. Learn the requirements of the Food Safety Modernization Act. What you need to know in order to prepare a food safety plan that meets the FSMA requirements. FSMA has been signed into law. FSMA focuses on the prevention of food illness. Food companies are required to have a food safety plan in place that meets the FSMA requirements. That food safety plan needs to be created by a Preventive Controls Qualified Individual (PCQI).

This lecture will cover key food safety hazards and other requirement associated with the coffee industry.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Chelan 5

Target Audience: R - Roasters, P - Producers, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Justo Garcia, Food Scientist, D'Origenn LLC

coffee farming & processing

friday, april 20

Farm Profitability – the Impact of Best Practices and GAP

A key finding of the recent SCA report is that implementing GAP may not always lead to more profitable coffee farms. This session brings together four researchers with on-going work in this area to explain and describe this issue.

The panelists will first share a basic definition of profit. It will look something like: (KGs x PRICE) - COSTS = PROFIT

Then, the authors will introduce their findings (5 minutes each), utilizing the above profitability definition to help illustrate their findings. For example, Technoserve, focusing on the “KGs” in the formula above, find that improved yields improve profits. RD2/SCA: also focusing on the “KGs” above formula, find the opposite. CIAT and Artisan both offer ground-breaking work on cost of production (the “costs” factor).

The panel of researchers will then explore GAP and profits utilizing evidence-based arguments (data slides) and referring to the profit formula above to help audience members follow the main points.

Questions posed by the moderator will include, how does farm-gate price impact farmer motivation to implement best practices? When farm-gate prices are low, does a low-input, low-yield strategy optimize farm resources? How does quality fit into to the profitability equation? Is training effective when farm-gate price is below cost of production?

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Tahoma 5

Target Audience: P - Producers, T- Traders, R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Mark Lundy, Senior Researcher, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)| Ruth Ann Church, President, Artisan Coffee Imports

Moderator: Kim Elena Ionescu, BA, English, Spanish, Latin American Studies, Specialty Coffee Association

NUTRICIÓN FOLIAR EN LOS PERÍODOS DE PRE Y POST-FLORACIÓN, Y SU INCIDENCIA EN LA FENOLOGIA Y PRODUCTIVIDAD DEL CAFETO (Coffea arábica)

El presente trabajo fue conducido para verificar respuestas fenologicas y efectos en la productividad ,al adicionar como complemento de nutricion paquetes de foliares en las epocas adecuadas y recomendadas por los tecnicos agricolas,que asesora cultivos de cafe a nivel de latinoamerica.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Chelan 2

Target Audience: CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

Translation Available: Spanish to English

SATURDAY, APRIL 21

Portraint Country: China - Coming Soon

Description Coming Soon.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Yakima 1

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers, R - Roasters, RO -Retail Operators, T- Traders

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

An Innovative and Impactful Model for Youth Engagement in the Coffeelands

One of the greatest challenges that threatens the future of specialty coffee is the growing migration of the sons and daughters of coffee farmers to urban centers where they perceive better opportunities for work and life. With the average age of coffee farmers approaching 60 years of age globally, and more young people leaving the coffeelands behind, we must ask ourselves, “Who is going to grow, harvest, and process the next generation of specialty coffee?”

Farmer Bros. Co., Aldea Global, and Lutheran World Relief (LWR) are supporting an innovative model in Jinotega, Nicaragua that is engaging young people in a program designed to improve the delivery of technical assistance to coffee farmers, while providing young people with a world-class technical education in coffee production. This experiential learning model will enable these sons and daughters of coffee farmers to put their knowledge to work in their own communities, by adding value to local cooperatives and other agricultural enterprises.

Representatives from Farmer Brothers, Aldea Global, LWR, and a young Nicaraguan program participant will each share their perspective on the importance this new model of youth engagement holds for Nicaragua and beyond.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Yakima 1

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders

Presenter(s): Molly Laverty, Director of Sustainability, Farmer Bros. Co. | Marvin Antonio Molina Zamora, Ingeniero Agrónomo, Lutheran World Relief | Maryeri Janeth López Chavarria, Promotora Rural en Café, Aldea Global | Warren E. Armstrong, General Manager, Association Aldea Global Jintega

Moderator(s): Rick Peyser, Senior Relationship Manager, Coffee & Cocoa, Lutheran World Relief

Translation Available: Spanish to English

roasting & retailing

Friday, April 20

Cafe Design & Company Culture: How thoughtful design can radically transform your company, your staff & your future.

All of us in the speciality coffee industry know the importance of designing an efficient and beautiful cafe. Whether craft or quick service, all of us want to serve the best drinks we can, in the shortest time possible to wildly exceed our customer's expectations. But can cafe design change your company culture?

In this presentation, you’ll meet three seasoned coffee professionals who have been instrumental in designing cafes to shift the way their companies do business. You’ll learn best practices for building out a successful location, discuss how your design impacts the customer experience & explore how a shift into retail (or a different aspect of the business) can radically change the culture of your company while providing growth opportunities to keep your staff engaged.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Yakima 1

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters, RO- Retail Operators, T - Traders, P - Producers

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

Moderator(s): Richard Sandlin

A Life in Coffee: Market Evolution, Small Business Survival, and Perseverance. 30-year perspective: Insights to Succeed

A Life in Coffee: a humorous, lively, and practical roadmap to identify the keys in the pursuit of professional and personal advancement. Mark speaks about "the 3Ps": Passion, People, and Perseverance outline a roadmap for small business success through staying on top of market trends, leveraging employee skills with small business management, and balancing the pressure from personal and professional demands.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 1

Target Audience: CE- Coffee Enthusiasts,R - Roasters, RO- Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Mark V. Hopwley, CEO, Pacific Bag Inc.

Saturday, April 21

Using Your Coffee Data as Business Intelligence to Deliver Quality, Consistency and Control

Specialty coffee’s artisanal and handcrafted customer face is real and supported by a complex supply chain and highly specialized production. These two things create and collect lots of information. Understanding what can be collected and how it can help coffee businesses is simpler than people think and is also the first step towards gaining real benefits. What’s more, ‘business intelligence’ is already accessible to businesses of all sizes and is easy to use and inexpensive. It helps remove guesswork for beginners and delivers new insights for experts. This lecture presents how this can be done with a focus on roastery information.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Chelan 5

Target Audience: B - Baristas, R - Roasters, P - Producers, RO- Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Andreas Idl, CEO, Cropster GmbH

Education in Specialty Coffee: Engaging or Alienating?

This lecture seeks to explore our industry's emphasis on educating customers, and the value of education for employees. While it has potential to be alienating, education will always add to an individual's experience of a product in specialty coffee. We hope to explore the roots of education in specialty coffee, what we are trying to teach people and why. We will also look at how this relates to mindful consumerism.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Chelan 4

Target Audience: B - Baristas, R - Roasters, RO- Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Amy Moore, Director of Public Education, Ipsento | Jennifer Haare, Director of Education, Director of Training and Staff Development, Ipsento

Does Decaf Matter?

Does decaf really matter? If so, to whom does it matter and what does that mean for those all along the supply chain? Bringing together insights, trends and best practices from across the supply chain, the panel will discuss and debate the importance of decaf as category. How do successful companies manage decaf sourcing, roasting and brewing? Is the same as regular coffee? Should it be? Come away with a better understanding of coffee without caffeine and its importance and impact on Specialty Coffee.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 2

Target Audience: B - Baristas, P - Producers, RO- Retail Operators, T- Traders, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Jen Apodaca Director of Roasting, Royal Coffee, Inc. | Ted Phillips Business Development - Specialty Coffee North America, Swiss Water Decaffeinated Coffee Company

Moderator(s): Aaron Braun

Creating Sustainable Careers in Specialty Coffee

Charles Jack, co-owner of Cat & Cloud Coffee and former Wall Street investment analyst, will present on why it’s hard to sustain a career in coffee and how we, as coffee company owners, can change that. Learn how Cat & Cloud as a small company has been able to implement profit sharing, provided four weeks paid vacation, medical insurance stipends, and sent over a third of their staff to origin - all in their first year of business.

As a barista or production roaster, it’s hard to make a living in the specialty coffee industry. Some of our industry’s brightest, most passionate, and creative individuals ultimately leave coffee for other higher paying industries even though their true passion lies in coffee. This is a shame as these people are the representatives of our industry - they are the direct connection to the consumer and are the keeper of our quality standards. In order to progress our industry and grow a truly sustainable specialty coffee presence these people need to be provided for, given a career path, and paid in a manner that’s competitive with other professional industries. The key to being able to provide these opportunities lies with the company owners. The age old question is this: Can you run a profitable business and still have enough money in the tank to provide a living wage for your employees? The answer is yes, you can. With better financial understanding, we can structure better businesses when we start them, run those businesses better, and provide a sustainable livelihood for our best people.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 1

Target Audience: B - Baristas, P - Producers, RO- Retail Operators, T- Traders, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Charles Jack, Co-Owner, Cat & Cloud Coffee

Permits, Emissions & Compliance: The Roastery Project

Your business is growing, new customers, new products, new distribution channels. It's time to install a new roaster. But wait, before you begin installation, you must have "Permit to Construct". For many coffee entrepreneurs, this is an overlooked part of the process but failure to meet local air permit requirements will have serious long-term consequences.

In this presentation, we will explore how to move from expansion idea through application, permit to construct, source testing, permit to operate ongoing compliance. We will also explore what to do if you get a notice of violation.

We will also cover the origin and reasons for environmental permits and we will review why emission requirements vary according to location.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 4

Target Audience: R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Scott Stouffer, Vice President, Probat, Inc.

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

An Innovative and Impactful Model for Youth Engagement in the Coffeelands

One of the greatest challenges that threatens the future of specialty coffee is the growing migration of the sons and daughters of coffee farmers to urban centers where they perceive better opportunities for work and life. With the average age of coffee farmers approaching 60 years of age globally, and more young people leaving the coffeelands behind, we must ask ourselves, “Who is going to grow, harvest, and process the next generation of specialty coffee?”

Farmer Bros. Co., Aldea Global, and Lutheran World Relief (LWR) are supporting an innovative model in Jinotega, Nicaragua that is engaging young people in a program designed to improve the delivery of technical assistance to coffee farmers, while providing young people with a world-class technical education in coffee production. This experiential learning model will enable these sons and daughters of coffee farmers to put their knowledge to work in their own communities, by adding value to local cooperatives and other agricultural enterprises.

Representatives from Farmer Brothers, Aldea Global, LWR, and a young Nicaraguan program participant will each share their perspective on the importance this new model of youth engagement holds for Nicaragua and beyond.

Time: 9 - 10:15am

Room: TCC Yakima 1

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders

Presenter(s): Molly Laverty, Director of Sustainability, Farmer Bros. Co. | Marvin Antonio Molina Zamora, Ingeniero Agrónomo, Lutheran World Relief | Maryeri Janeth López Chavarria, Promotora Rural en Café, Aldea Global | Warren E. Armstrong, General Manager, Association Aldea Global Jintega

Moderator(s): Rick Peyser, Senior Relationship Manager, Coffee & Cocoa, Lutheran World Relief

Translation Available: Spanish to English

TRADING & COMMERCE

FRIDAY, APRIL 20

How Coffee Producers Can Benefit from Ecommerce

Representatives from green coffee importers, tech companies and trading platforms will discuss how ecommerce can empower coffee producers. Panelists will address what companies have done to improve access to producers and producer content as well as how access can continue to be improved. Additionally, the panel will talk about what producers can do to make sure they are represented well online through multiple sales channels.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Chelan 4

Target Audience: P- Producers, R - Roasters, T - Traders, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

Moderator(s): Alexandra Katona-Carroll

SATURDAY, APRIL 21

Coffee is a Business (whether you like it or not): A Journey into the Black

Owning and operating a coffee business is a sexy idea. But many operators are too bogged down working "in" our business instead of working "on" our business for it to ever feel this great. In this lecture, Andrew Gough will tell his business story using real data, and share a simple tool for monitoring your business markers.

Most coffee business owners come to coffee later in life, leaving behind a career, often to find there are many important discoveries along the way. Vision, leadership, strategy, management and mentorship are all concepts worth investing in. Andrew will demonstrate how each of these concepts can safely be used in your business to promote a culture of success for all.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Chelan 5

Target Audience: B - Baristas, RO- Retail Operators, R - Roasters, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Andrew Gough, Founder & President, Reverie Roasters

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

Making Donor Dollars Count

Coffee has recently become a priority for donor-funded agricultural development projects. However, despite some successes from these investments, there remains a need to collaborate more closely with the private sector. How can collaboration among donors, the private and public sectors become more effective? How can donor-funded coffee projects which utilize performance targets and planning and control systems generate effective results? Should donors such as the U.S. government facilitate a private-sector driven approach or focus primarily on well-regulated activities through non-governmental stakeholders?

This panel will discuss and systematize lessons learned on what is needed at the ground-level to improve partnerships between donors and the private sector, as well as strategies to eliminate duplication of efforts and encourage collaborative behavior among the private and public sectors to make cost-effective investments.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Tahoma 5

Target Audience: RO - Retail Operators, P - Producers, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, T - Traders

Presenter(s): Gilberto Baraona, Farmer, Los Pirineos Coffee Farm | Frank Reese, General Manager, Molinos de Honduras (Volcafe/ED&F MAN) | Lisa Conway, Operations Director, Coffee Quality Institute | Evelio Francisco Alvarado, MBA, Anacafé/Guatemalan Coffees

Moderator(s): Jocelyn G. Brown, Deputy Administrator - Office of Capacity Building and Development, Foreign Agricultural Service/USDA

Coffee Price Volatility: Can We Mitigate It?

Do Coffee prices operate in a vacuum? Are they impacted solely by fundamentals? Or are there other factors that should be considered when formulating a Price Risk Management strategy? Moreover, what effect does an increasingly globalized economy have on Coffee price volatility, and just how correlated are Coffee fundamentals to currency fluctuations and global interest rates among other economic indicators.

This presentation will look to expound upon the most up to date financial tools available to the worldwide Coffee industry to mitigate the volatility and risk in Coffee prices. Through the use of case studies and clear cut examples, the most relevant risk management strategies will be discussed; and a generous question and answer session will allow all participants to engage.

Time: 10:30 - 11:45am

Room: TCC Chelan 2

Target Audience: T- Traders, R - Roasters, P - Producers, RO- Retail Operators, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, B - Baristas

Presenter(s): Coming Soon

 
 
 

Meet the Presenters

Coming Soon!