LECTURES

Lectures are categorized by industry focus (i.e. Humanities & Social Sciences, Sustainability, Science & Innovation, Coffee Farming & Processing, Roasting & Retailing, Trading & Commerce)

Translation Available: To access the translation service, you can pick up a rental headset prior to attending the lecture.  Headsets will be available in the TCC and require a photo ID.


HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES

FRIDAY, APRIL 12

Holy Grounds: The Surprising Connection Between Coffee and Faith

From the coffee bean’s discovery by 9th century Ethiopian Muslims to being condemned as “Satan’s drink” by medieval Christians to becoming an integral part of Passover in America, coffee has fueled prayer and shaped religious culture for generations. Popular author, avid coffee drinker, and Episcopal priest Tim Schenck will base this lecture on his forthcoming book Holy Grounds: The Surprising Spiritual Connection Between Coffee and Faith — From Dancing Goats to Satan’s Brew (Fortress Press, 2019).

In an engaging, non-sectarian presentation full of humor and insight, Schenck will explore the power of ritual, unpack lessons from coffeehouse culture about building healthy, authentic community, and share some personal experiences from his recent adventures journeying through coffee farms in Central America, making a pilgrimage to Seattle, visiting coffeehouses in Rome, and staying at a monastic community in Pennsylvania where monks roast and market their own beans.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 254B

Target Audience: CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): The Rev. Tim Schenck, Rector, St. John's Episcopal Church, St. John's Episcopal Church, Hingham, Massachusetts

A Career In Coffee? Why It Can, and Should, Happen

A lot has been written about the workforce -- millennials in particular -- choosing between a career and a passion. That shouldn't be the case. While baristas and other coffee professionals may find it hard to make millions, they should be able to make sustainable wages while also developing as a professional. What are ways that cafes, roasting companies, and other coffee industry organizations can provide this working environment? Two small business owners with a proven track record in employee recruitment, development and retention, will offer an in-depth behind-the-scenes look into how it's all possible.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 253C

Target Audience: R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas

Moderator: TBD

Panelists: TBD

The Effect of Third Wave Coffee Towards Coffee Farmers's Sovereignty

This lecture will highlight the growing coffee industry worldwide where coffee companies are competing in the fast growing international economy and global capitalism. However, what can coffee farmers get from all those development in the coffee industry? From the perspective of coffee producing country, the lecture will present the promising future for coffee farmers within the third wave phase by developing a well structured direct trade method based prioritizing on tackling the social economy issues.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 254A

Target Audience: P - Producers, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, T - Traders

Presenter(s): Radiv Muhammad Aflah Annaba, Bachelor of International Relations and Coffee Researcher, Sensuri Coffee Company Indonesia

Learning from Each Other: Generations of Specialty Coffee in Conversation

This panel discussion brings together specialty-coffee professionals from across the spectrum of age, experience, knowledge, opinion, and philosophy. In a lively and candid conversation, this diverse group of passionate coffee people will share, teach, listen, laugh, argue, and grow with one another with help from two moderators (who are themselves on different points of that spectrum) and audience Q & A.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 254B

Target Audience: RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, R - Roasters, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, T - Traders

Moderator: Ever Meister, Managing Editor, Cafe Imports | Donald Schoenholt, President / Coffeeman, Gillies Coffee Company

Panelists: Michelle Johnson, The Chocolate Barista / Barista Hustle | Khanh Tran, Founder | Q-Grader, Greater Goods Roasting Company | Barth Anderson, Owner, Barrington Coffee Roasting Company | J. David Waldman, Rojo’s Roastery

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

The Future of Coffee: Building Long-Distance Relationships in Emerging Origins

World Coffee Research predicts that within the next 30 years, the demand for coffee will double while viable land in current coffee growing countries will diminish by half. How can we combat this? Through an engaging panel discussion, learn about the future of coffee production in emerging origins such as Myanmar and Nepal and the role consumers, roasters, and importers can play in building long-term, mutually beneficial relationships across culture and distance.

Time: 9:00am- 10:00am

Room: 253A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Craig Holt, Founder & CEO of Atlas Coffee Importers

Panelists: Al Liu, Vice President of Coffee, Colectivo Coffee Roasters | Mario Fernandez, Technical Director, Coffee Quality Institute

Lead from the Heart - Coffee, Connection, and Community

In today’s world of tremendous turmoil, baristas are perfectly poised to lead the way to civil dialogue and shared understanding of their community’s most pressing issues. Heart centered experiences created by baristas, no matter how quick or small, can fuel joy, connection and healing in the community.

Coffee quality, sophistication of the machine and ambiance of the store are all critical to the success of a coffee shop. However, the one ingredient that makes the coffee come alive is the human element. A barista with a nod, a smile, a brief moment of engagement can fuel the spark for how the rest of the day unfolds.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 252A

Target Audience: B - Baristas, RO - Roaster Operators, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Hema Naryanan, Founder, No Ceiling ~ Aspire, Act, Flourish as a Servant Leader

Panelists: Major Cohen, Senior Project Manager, AST-SCA Licensed Instructor, Starbucks CAP Coffee Ambassador / Starbucks | Michelle Costello, District Manager / Dunkin | Mattea Fleischner, Manager Global Social Impact / Starbucks

Barriers and Potentialities of the Honduran Coffee Sector for Women’s Empowerment

This lecture presents the main results of a research that analyses barriers and potentialities of the Honduran coffee sector for women’s empowerment.

Coffee represents the largest agricultural product in Honduras. However, only 18.67% of producers are women, with 14.85% of the total production. Out of these, 93.62% are producers of small farms (2 average hectares). Furthermore, these data only show who sells, making women's participation along the value chain invisible. In the lecture, we will give an account of the opinions of 56 women representing the entire coffee chain in Honduras (day laborers, producers, toasters, tasters, baristas, managers of cooperatives / companies, exporters, trainers) about the challenges women are facing as well as the opportunities they see in the sector.

Understanding empowerment as a process that includes both individual changes and collective action, and involves the radical alteration of the processes and structures that reproduce the subordinate position of women as a gender, we analyze the opinions of the interviewed women as well as the local context to suggest possible strategies that should be simultaneously promoted to enhance Honduran women's position in the coffee sector.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 253C

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE- Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers, R - Roasters, T - Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Michela Accerenzi, MSc in Development Economics / Present: Regional Coordinator for Central America, Fundación ETEA para el Desarrollo y la Cooperación | Katia Lisseth Duke Guerra, Agronomist, coffee producer, Casa Ixchel / Finca San Isidro

Translation Available: TBD

Coffeehouse Politics: Past and Present

The coffeehouse has a long and storied tradition. A place where powerful ideas and people from different walks of life come together, and where community, social and political organizing are fueled. From “penny universities” of 17th and 18th century London, to anti-war movements of the Vietnam era in the United States, to standing up in support of refugees and immigrants, this tradition is carried on in coffeehouses today.

Each panelist will share their experiences on the role of coffeehouses in social and political movements and current opportunities and challenges in claiming the coffeehouse as place for community conversation and action.

Remarks will be followed by Q&A from the audience.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 252B

Target Audience: R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: TBD

Panelists: TBD

SUNDAY, APRIL 14

Building, Retaining and Growing Your Company's A-Team!

In this lecture, I will be sharing with you the key points that I've learned in how to build an A-Team. These points include the hiring process; which applicants to interview, how to interview and what does the interview process look like. Next, a training outline and training team. How do you bring on a new-hire effectively and efficiently with minimum impact on the surrounding staff and your customer base. Lastly, team building...as you're hiring and building this A-Team, how is it that you retain them and encourage growth within the company. Within your A-Team, I will give you some tools on identifying your leadership team.

Time: 9:00am- 10:00am

Room: 253B

Target Audience: B - Baristas, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Kimberly Brown, Owner, Akamai Coffee Company

Explaining Consumer Indifference Toward Sustainability in the Specialty Coffee Value Chain and What Might Be Done to Overcome It

Although there are different "shades" of consumer sustainability, consumers don't necessarily recognize that sustainability has shades of its own. In part, this is due to the complexities of the coffee value chain; the average consumer perceives coffee as a commodity product, while the specialty coffee industry recognizes sustainable benefits provided at each stage from bean-to-cup. If the specialty coffee industry is to broaden its market and make coffee more sustainable, it needs to increase average consumers' awareness of the deeper shades of sustainability. The purpose of this talk is to break down consumer perceptions of specialty coffee as they relate to marketplace sustainability. In particular, I highlight some of the consumer psychology behind perceptions of the coffee value chain, what motivates consumers' prosocial behaviors, why some consumers view independent certifications as a normative standard for sustainability, and what types of information can roasters provide consumers with--be they farmer/roaster narratives or transparency through blockchain technology--to bridge the value chain information gap.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 253C

Target Audience: R - Roasters, P - Producers, RO - Retail Operators, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, T - Traders

Presenter(s): Spencer Ross, Assistant Professor of Marketing, UMass Lowell

Coffee And Youth: Teach to Fish but Give a Fishing Rod

Trevor Noah in his book “born a crime”, added to the Chinese proverb Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime. By noting that the skill might not necessarily feed for a lifetime, one also needs to have the tools to effectively use the skill. The challenge of youth and gender involvement in the coffee sector has more to do than just education and skill. It also has to do with the opportunity to use the tools and poses this to effectively utilize the newly acquired skill. Our experience at the Utake Coffee mentorship program is that once youth learn they get a skill. But once you give them a opportunitye to use the skill and tools to effectively utilize the skill then they can feed themselves for life. As we work as a sector on SDG 8 to ensure that we contribute to productive employment of youth and equal opportunities for gender, the importance of the rod in addition to the fishing skill should not be under estimated.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 254B

Target Audience: R - Roasters, P - Producers, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, T - Traders

Presenter(s): Mbula Musau, Chief Empowerment Officer, Utake Coffee

Innovative Problem Solving : A Design Thinking Approach

A lecture for supporting business and community leaders to utilize empathy in building a better understanding of their team or community, challenge assumptions and reject basic solutions for a more inclusive, diverse and culturally fit organization. Learn about the process that designers use to extract, teach, learn and apply knowledge: Design Thinking. Attendees will review human centered techniques and explore creativity tools to expand their ability to build the culture they want for themselves and their community.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 253B

Target Audience: B - Baristas, RO - Retail Operators, R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Mansi Chokshi, Experience Director, Specialty Coffee Association

From Conflict to Coffee: Overcoming Barriers for Coffee Growers in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Tragically, many of the world’s best coffee-growing areas are littered with landmines and explosive remnants of war, which impact coffee production as coffee plants go unpicked when farmers fear where they step and mined roads block coffee transport. Producers disabled by conflict often give up farming or sell their farms to make ends meet.

Coffee production in the DRC, once called a burgeoning “paradise for coffee” due to its latitude, altitude and rainfall, was decimated by decades of unrest and armed conflict. Yet the DRC has significant potential to meet rising consumer demand for specialty coffee, and coffee production has the potential to bring peace, hope and better livelihoods to battle-scarred farmers living in the fertile highlands of Lake Kivu.

This panel explores the confluence of coffee and conflict in the DRC, and how skilled jobs and an inclusive environment for survivors and other people with disabilities within the coffee value chain offers an alternative to conflict and a better quality of life for coffee growers. Competitive employment in coffee offers an alternative to violence, greed, and injustice. Rehabilitation helps coffee growers to regain mobility, develop job skills, overcome discrimination, and ultimately return to leading productive lives within their communities.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 251

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T - Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, B - Baristas, RO - Roaster Operators

Moderator: Rick Peyser, Sr. Relationship Manager, Coffee & Cocoa, Lutheran World Relief | Dean Cycon, Owner of Dean's Beans Organic Coffee

Panelists: Madam Adolphine Muley Byayuwa, Minister of Agriculture and Environment, South Kivu, DR Congo, co-founder of Saveur du Kivu | Adrien Nzuzi, Congolese humanitarian worker supporting the Polus Center for Social and Economic Development in Democratic Republic of Congo | Julienne Masika Paypay, training to be a prosthetic technician at the Centre Pour Handicapees Physiques (CHP) in Goma DRC | Dennis Hadrick, Program Officer, Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement, U.S. Department of State | Gilbert Makelele, S.CPNCK Co-operative and a Network of Advocacy

More than Mochas: Exploring Chocolate and Coffee Together

Chocolate's possibilities in specialty cafes are often overlooked, especially considering the long history of chocolate beverage consumption and the unique recipes that bring coffee and chocolate together. Learn more about how the specialty coffee and chocolate industries relate to one another, with attention to both global politics and local potential.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 252B

Target Audience: B - Baristas, RO - Retail Operators, R - Roasters, P - Producers, CE - Coffee Enhthusiasts

Presenter(s): Carla Martin, Executive Director, Fine Cacao and Chocolate Institute | Jose Lopez Ganem, Project Manager, Fine Cacao and Chocolate Institute

SUSTAINABILITY

friday, april 12

Attracting and Retaining Farmworkers – Innovations from Colombia

Skilled farmworkers are necessary to harvest specialty coffees in most parts of the world, but they are too often undervalued and invisible to the industry.

A collaborative and innovative project in Colombia is attracting a dwindling labor force to actively participate in coffee production. Its main objective is to meet the needs of farmworkers, producers, and local organizations, while identifying solutions that will make employment within the coffee industry more socially viable. After a year and half on the ground, this project has seen marked improvements in:

  • Recognition of farmworkers and their contributions to the coffee supply chain.
  • Resource-sharing between coffee producers and farmworkers within the co-op
  • Project design and buy-in from farmworkers themselves.
  • Portfolio of services offered to farmworkers and their families that have given them a sense of job security and peace of mind

This lecture will present a summary of best practices that have been captured by this project and will guide producers and organizations to make employment within the coffee industry more attractive and socially viable for farmworkers.

The lecture will be complemented with a brief overview of Labor Dynamics in coffee, and the root causes of some of the global issues facing farmworkers.

Time: 9:00am- 10:00am

Room: 253A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Colleen Popkin, Senior Manager, Sustainability - Keurig Dr. Pepper

Panelists: Angela Pelaez, Sustainability Manager, RGC Coffee | Carlos Isaza, Coffee Program Manager, Solidaridad Colombia | Quinn Kepes, Program Director, Verité | Cesar Julio Diaz, General Manager, Aguadas Coffee Growers Cooperative

Coordinating Around a Gender Lens: Actionable Solutions for Sustainable Development from Seed to Service

The 2018 “Gender Equality in the Coffee Sector” insight report from the International Coffee Organization states that coordination of gender-inclusive programs across the coffee value chain can create greater financial and social impact.

In practice, it’s clear that market participants who are coordinating around a “gender lens” are creating a new economic logic in coffee that bridges the market logic of financial returns with the social logic of women’s rights. A lens provides a frame of reference that helps define opportunities. Coordinating around a gender lens allows us all to gain new perspectives, address poorly understood inequalities, uncover new opportunities and find new solutions. The results accelerate our collective ability to achieve sustained, inclusive and equitable economic growth to ensure Sustainable Development.

This lecture unites two transformational organizations on a single stage to explore how forward-acting market participants are addressing Sustainable Development through coordinated gender initiatives. They have assembled a panel that will discuss their learnings to implement actionable solutions to equality challenges in coffee communities, create positive models for change and inspire others to do the same.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 251

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Kellem Emanuele

Panelists: TBD

A Two Part Arc About the C Market and the Future of Specialty Coffee- Part 1

Overview: In his Re:co presentation in 2018, Ric Rhinehart presented a compelling perspective on the ability of coffee to provide a sustainable household income to smallholder producers. Using a hypothetical farm gate price of $1.40 per pound, Ric was able to demonstrate how current levels of productivity and market pressures are failing smallholder producers. Throughout all of 2018 the C market, the main price discovery mechanism and clearing house for coffee, has been below this hypothetical price of $1.40 causing the specialty coffee industry to question the value and existence of the C market, express concern over the multi-dimensional costs to producers, countries and the environment, and think about incorporating innovative solutions in their businesses. This 3 part series will provide clarity and actionable data for the specialty industry.

LECTURE 1:

  • C market explanation

LECTURE 2: Costs:

  • Production
  • Migration
  • Environmental
  • Coffee Supply Chain:

LECTURE 3: Alternative price discovery.

  • The New Social Contract
  • Learnings from the Fair Trade Trade Standard
  • Data Donating

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 253A

Target Audience: RO - Retail Operators, P - Producers, B - Baristas, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: David Piza

Panelists: Albert Scalla, Senior Vice President, INTL FC Stone | Rene Leon, Executive Secretary, Promecafe | Xinia Chaves, President, ICAFE | Colleen Anunu, Director of Coffee Supply Chain, Fair Trade USA | James Hoffman, CEO / Founder, Square Mile Coffee Roasters | Chad Trewick, Founder, Reciprocafe

A Two Part Arc About the C Market and the Future of Specialty Coffee- Part 2

Overview: In his Re:co presentation in 2018, Ric Rhinehart presented a compelling perspective on the ability of coffee to provide a sustainable household income to smallholder producers. Using a hypothetical farm gate price of $1.40 per pound, Ric was able to demonstrate how current levels of productivity and market pressures are failing smallholder producers. Throughout all of 2018 the C market, the main price discovery mechanism and clearing house for coffee, has been below this hypothetical price of $1.40 causing the specialty coffee industry to question the value and existence of the C market, express concern over the multi-dimensional costs to producers, countries and the environment, and think about incorporating innovative solutions in their businesses. This 3 part series will provide clarity and actionable data for the specialty industry.

LECTURE 1:

  • C market explanation

LECTURE 2: Costs:

  • Production
  • Migration
  • Environmental
  • Coffee Supply Chain:

LECTURE 3: Alternative price discovery.

  • The New Social Contract
  • Learnings from the Fair Trade Trade Standard
  • Data Donating

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 253A

Target Audience: RO - Retail Operators, P - Producers, B - Baristas, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: David Piza

Panelists: Albert Scalla, Senior Vice President, INTL FC Stone | Rene Leon, Executive Secretary, Promecafe | Xinia Chaves, President, ICAFE | Colleen Anunu, Director of Coffee Supply Chain, Fair Trade USA | James Hoffman, CEO / Founder, Square Mile Coffee Roasters | Chad Trewick, Founder, Reciprocafe

Theory of Change

The presentation is disruptive and modern, oriented to the new generations of members of the coffee industry who want to develop sustainability programs in coffee producing countries.

The presentation focuses on the Valuing Water Principles to Manos al Agua. The Valuing Water Principles is an initiative of the World Bank and the United Nations to implement water management projects. Manos al Agua, a PPP, has been invited by the Dutch government to multiple water events to present the case as a successful example on applying the necessary steps to assure environmental projects fulfill the proposed goals. The Valuing Water Principles of Manos al Agua have been presented at the United Nations in New York and during World Water Week in Stockholm. The audiences during both presentations were not part of the coffee industry.

Manos al Agua was also the recipient of the Corporate Sustainaiblity Award 2018 of the SCA. We can share the slides of the presentation upon request.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 253B

Target Audience: B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, T - Traders, R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Carolina Castañeda Gaviria, Director Europe, Federacion Nacional de Cafeteros de Colombia BV

Translation Available: English to Spanish, Spanish to English

Assessing and Addressing Profitability Constraints for Smallholder Coffee Producers in Yepocapa, Guatemala: Science Meets Application (AKA, Talk meets Walk)

Over the last 5 years the hundreds of smallholder coffee farmers in Yepocapa, Guatemala experienced leaf-rust, drought, volcanic eruptions and price fluctuations. Profitability is the main constraint these farmers face, in maintaining healthy households and addressing issues sufficiently to continue in coffee production - much like many other smallholder coffee farmers around the world. Since 2015, Taya Brown has been conducting a multi-phase evaluation of constraints to technology uptake and profitability as part of a World Coffee Research development project that implemented the Centroamericano hybrid to address leaf-rust and low-productivity. During a similar timeframe, Ryan Chipman founded Yepocapa Coffee, a US-based coffee importing enterprise focused on improving quality and transparency by working directly between Yepocapa farmers and US roasters. Using participatory techniques, Taya was able to measure Yepocapa Coffee’s effectiveness in addressing the issue of profitability and see coffee farming renewed as a sustainable career in Yepocapa. Taya will share results of the research, including profitability analyses for four farmer groups, and Ryan will share the experience of starting a business that addresses coffee quality and profitability constraints. The presentation will include professional video showing the farmers’ own discussion on these issues and the link between coffee quality and farm profitability.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 253B

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, B - Baristas

Presenter(s): Taya Brown, PhD Candidate; Program Coordinator, Center for Coffee Research and Education | Ryan Chipman, Owner and founder, coffee importer, Yepocapa Coffee

Saturday, april 13

Using Scale for Good: Surprising Facts About McDonald's Global Coffee Retail Business. A Conversation w McDonald's, COSA, CI and Major Roasters

It is a surprise to some that McDonald’s buys large quantities of specialty-grade coffee while advancing, at the same time, a unique sustainability strategy. The panel supplies some of the best known chains in America and - with tough questions - we will unveil why and how some of the major players prefer a status quo and avoid new levels of transparency and measurable sustainability performance as well as how a major global brand is shifting the commercial landscape among leading roasters and suppliers.

Explore how this new SIP platform engages the idea of “scale for good” as a shared approach to results-based sustainability among suppliers. We will discuss how this can affect our evolving industry’s commitment to sustainability with some distinct types of approaches that have been integrated into major supply chains and feature unprecedented levels of transparency and the use of data science.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 252A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Moderator: Daniele Giovannucci, President Committee on Sustainability Assessment

Panelists: Townsend Bailey, Director, Supply Chain Sustainability, McDonald's U.S.A. | Molly Laverty, Director of Sustainability, Farmer Brothers | Olga Cuellar, Sustainability Strategy Leader, S&D Coffee & Tea

Creating the SCA Sustainability Skills Program: Educating a New Wave of Sustainability Professionals in Specialty Coffee

Until now, the coffee industry has lacked a comprehensive curriculum to train sustainability professionals. Comprising the four creators of the new SCA Sustainability Skills Program, this panel will discuss how the program came to be and how it relates to everyone's work in coffee. The panelists will offer insights into the new program and how, through education, we can build a more sustainable supply chain.

Kate Fischer will discuss the vision for the program and the challenges in creating courses to cover issues ranging from paper cups to climate change, compost bags, and the C price. Hanes Motsinger will discuss how current trends in individual sustainability initiatives inspired the program, and the role collective action can play in building more effective, inclusive, and relevant initiatives. Erika Koss will discuss the history of the terms sustainability and resilience, encouraging us to consider why the word “sustainability” matters—and what we should know about the concept. Finally, Nora Burkey will talk about the challenges of putting learning into action in an industry where specialty coffee is confused with sustainable coffee, and how the courses can create the enabling environment the industry needs to ensure that specialty coffee is equal to sustainable coffee.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 254A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, B - Baristas, RO - Retail Operators

Moderator: TBD

Panelists: Nora Burkey, Executive Director, The Chain Collaborative | Erika Koss, PhD Candidate, St. Mary's University | Kate Fischer, Ph.D., Instructor, Honors Program, University of Colorado - Boulder | Hanes Motsinger, Program Manager, ABQid

Business Models for Climate Adaptation: Leveraging Short-Term Incentives for Long-Term Gain

Under their Carbon, Climate and Coffee initiative, Coop Coffees is innovating their Impact Fund to provide support for coffee farmers to learn and adapt to long-term climate trends. A partnership with the agricultural sector’s Cool Farm Alliance will help coffee coops learn how to link harmonized GHG emissions tracking and quantification, with direct "carbon premium" payments as climate adaptation incentives to build soil quality, renovate aging coffee plots and better manage water resources. While many farmers know what to do to adapt to volatile weather, it's often the business and financing support that is missing to invest in longer-term solutions. This panel will share new approaches to risk sharing and bridging this divide.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 253C

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders

Moderator: Stephanie Daniels, Sr. Director, Ag & Development, Sustainable Food Lab

Panelists: Monika Firl, Director of Sustainability, CoopCoffees/CoopSol Cafe Equitable | Daniella Malin, Deputy General Manager, Cool Farm Alliance | Javier Dominguez, Commercial Manager Sol y Cafe, Jaen - Peru | Laurence Jassogne, Project Coordinator - Systems Agronomist, Country Representative International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA)

Crafting Sustainability with the Coffee Chain

Despite the fact that many resources have been invested in addressing sustainability problems, the impacts have not been achieved, the communities have been intervened, but they have not been protagonists in the design and implementation of the projects. Based on the interest to improve the impact on sustainability, for several years now, different relevant actors in the chain have decided to work collaboratively with an innovative approach that actively involves communities. The sustainability panel will show, from real cases, how to implement sustainability programs with better results. Our experience is based on the following principles:

  1. Listen to the communities and make them protagonists in the solution of their sustainability problems.
  2. Focus on a few sustainability issues as the starting point of the programs and that become the engine of long-range initiatives that are built in conjunction with the community after working hand in hand with them
  3. Work collaboratively by integrating different actors (roaster, importer, cooperatives, NGOs, communities) to take advantage of strengths and ensure continuity over time.

We will present projects focused on: women, rural workers, climate change, revolving funds managed by communities, among others

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 253A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Kim Elena Ionescu, *Chief Sustainability Officer, Specialty Coffee Association

Panelists: | Meredith Taylor, Sustainability Manager, Counter Culture Coffee | Angela Pelaez, Sustainability Manager, RGC Coffee Inc | Carlos Isaza, Coffee Program Manager, Solidaridad, Colombia | Gladys Hernandez, Woman coffee farmer, Farm Casa Grande, Village Chilicambe, La Plata Huila Colombia.

Understanding Environmental Sustainability in a Café: A Life Cycle Analysis to Show where Small Changes have the Greatest Impact

Despite the significant media focus in recent years on the environmental impact of disposable coffee cups, we found that they are less than 1% of the problem in terms of the environmental footprint of cafes.

We conducted a full lifecycle analysis around the coffee supply chain to investigate what impacts all waste streams have on the environment. We compared waste streams using the Swiss Ecopoint method, placing all waste streams on a common basis. We found that the greatest impact on the environment along the entire coffee supply chain were from espresso machines, milk usage and wastewater. Even a 1% change in machine water efficiency, and 3% changes in milk usage can result in a 3-fold environmental impact reduction than if paper cups were eliminated from cafes entirely.

As a result of this work, we recommend a number of strategies that can help cafes reduce their environmental impact significantly. Many of the strategies also improved café profitability. Ultimately, we believe implementation of some of these strategies will improve both the environmental and economic sustainability of cafes in the future.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 254B

Target Audience: B - Baristas, R - Roaster Operators

Presenter(s): Adam Carr, Coffee Science and Education Centre Manager, Seven Miles Coffee Roasters

A SAFE Journey: Transformation Through Multi-Stakeholder Collaborations

The Coffee Barometer 2018 (https://hivos.org/sites/default/files/coffee_barometer_2018.pdf) emphasizes that true transformation requires individual companies to disregard competitive differences and genuinely engage and invest in collaborative investments at grassroots levels. The SAFE Platform (http://www.safeplatform.org/), managed by Hivos and powered by the Inter-American Development Bank, is a multi-stakeholder initiative that has been working since 2015 to transform coffee and cocoa landscapes in Latin America. Members and other leading industry actors have highlighted the Platform’s efforts in piloting innovative projects and creating dialogue within the sector towards collaborative change.

The execution of a project and knowledge sharing platform has been gratifying, but also challenging. The panel includes actors from different areas of the coffee value chain that will provide insight into the benefits and challenges faced in the implementation of SAFE, as well as pointing out key factors that can make multi-stakeholder alliances successful.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 251

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Juan Pablo Solís, SAFE Platform Manager, Hivos

Panelists: Alejandro Escobar, Lead AgroBusiness Specialist - Inter-American Development Bank | Michelle Deugd, Director of Agriculture, Landscapes, and Livelihoods - Rainforest Alliance | Alejandro Escobar, Managing Director, North America - Hanns R. Neumann Stiftung -jan.enden@hrnstiftung.org | Colleen Popkin, Senior Manager, Sustainability - Keurig Dr. Pepper

Scaling Sustainable Sourcing: How to Ensure that Everyone from Source to Shelf Wins

Not all coffee is the same, so not all sustainability strategies are the same. Ever wonder what goes on in a company when determining a sourcing strategy and related commitment? There are a number of avenues available to coffee companies developing a sustainable sourcing strategy. Traceability, transparency, certification, verification, direct trade. It can seem overwhelming and confusing. What do they encompass? What is the difference in the approaches? And are they right for your business? In this session, an array of companies will talk about how critical issues (e.g. price transparency, forest conservation, labor practices) shape their strategies, how they developed a response to tackle them and what approaches have gotten traction with farmers, internal business partners and consumers.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 252B

Target Audience: B - Baristas, RO - Retail Operators, P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Parker Townley, Senior Manager, Coffee, Fair Trade USA

Panelists: Olga Cuellar, Sustainability Strategy Leader, S&D Coffee and Tea | Bambi Semroc, VP, Sustainable Markets and Strategy, Conservation International | Meredith Taylor, Sustainability Manager, Counter Culture Coffee | Stephen Robertson, Director of Sales and Marketing, Blanchard Coffee

Who Defines Sustainability

Sustainability metrics are increasingly embedded in corporate practices. Many have begun to define sustainability through the prism of corporate goals and interventions applying them to the producers within the supply chain. But as the drive to reach – and measure – these goals becomes greater, we need to step back and ask if we have defined sustainability correctly? Are the sustainability goals of corporations the same as producers’ goals? How can we ensure that industry sustainability programs and producers are aligned?

This multi-stakeholder panel will explore the fundamental questions around who holds the power in defining sustainability and offer examples of best practices for making sustainability, actually sustainable for each supply chain actor.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 253A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, RO - Retail Operators

Moderator: Ileana Resendez, Head of MEL CLAC-Fairtrade, CLAC

Panelists: Liam Brody, Sustainable Harvest | Rafael Furtado Fonseca, COOMAP | Carlos Leite, Professor, Federal University of Viçosa, Brazil

Burundi Portrait Sponsor

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 251

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): TBD

Lessons Learned From the Implementation of Coffee Hybrid Demonstration Plots in Three Central American Countries

The Resilient Coffee for Central America project, funded by USAID and administered by the Borlaug Institute at Texas A&M University, is creating a more robust and climate-resilient coffee sector in the three Central American countries of El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala, through reduction of risk and uncertainty to producers and strengthening adaptive capacities of smallholder farmers. Key activities include support for evidence-based methodologies, such as product diversification (honey, compost, others), soil protection (biochar, nutrient management), and introduction of improved coffee varieties.

Presenters will discuss the project background and goals and give preliminary results related to the introduction of new coffee hybrids, including constraints to technology uptake specific to smallholder farmers, factors affecting productivity, potential for profitability increase, effectiveness at addressing climate-change related issues, and cup quality. The presentations will also include an analysis of productivity and profitability increase due to hybrid implementation within smallholder coffee producing communities in Guatemala, an analysis of quality and sensory parameters of the Centroamericano hybrids, challenges and successes related to the identification and implementation of the demo plots, and examples of practices or processes that could serve as a model for other implementation projects.

Time: TBD

Room: TBD

Target Audience: P - Producers

Moderator: Leo Lombardini, Center Director and Professor, Center for Coffee Research & Education, Texas A&M University

Panelists: Luis Alberto Cuellar Gomez, Project Director, Borlaug Institute for International Agriculture | José Omar Rodríguez, Managing Director, Cooperativa Cafetalera Las Capucas, Ltd. | Taya Brown, PhD Candidate, Program Coordinator, Center for Coffee Research and Education, & Department of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A&M University | Sarah C. Brinkley, PhD Student, Center for Coffee Research and Education, & Department of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A&M University

SUNDAY, APRIL 14

Can (and Should) the Coffee Sector Make a Zero Deforestation Commitment?

Palm oil, cocoa, soy, beef all have made sector-wide zero deforestation commitments as have many other industries as part of the New York Declaration on Forests, the Tropical Forest Alliance, Consumer Goods Forum, and other initiatives. These have been big events with CEOs making commitments to sourcing deforestation free commodities. Coffee has not made an equivalent announcement. As climate change makes higher altitudes more suitable for specialty coffee and lower altitudes less so coffee could become a more important driver of deforestation in the coming decade – especially for the last remaining intact tropical forests that are also home to orangutans, panthers, jaguars, tigers and other rare species.

In this session we will have the chance to learn from the cocoa and palm oil sectors to explore how they came to make such commitments and how they are implementing them. We will explore what commitments already exist in the coffee sector and we will show what a similar commitment could mean for the coffee sector - what forests would be conserved, what the sector would need to do and how we would track success.

Time: TBD

Room: TBD

Target Audience: P - Producers, RO - Retail Operators, R - Roasters, T- Traders

Moderator: TBD

Panelists: Bambi Semroc, VP, Sustainable Markets and Strategy, Conservation International | Ethan Budiansky, Director of Environment, World Cocoa Foundation | Christy Melhart Slay, Ph.D., Director, Technical Alignment, The Sustainability Consortium

What Do We Know About Diversification? Engaged Research to Learn What Works and Why

Diversification has become a catchall term that can refer to environmental efforts to manage risk, enhance soil fertility, optimize productivity (biodiversity), generate alternative income streams, and improve diets (diversified livelihoods). Yet, despite persistent calls for ‘diversification,’ there is a lack of empirical research on: 1) the limitations and contributions of diversification strategies to households, gender relations, communities, and food security and systems; and 2) the extent to which the way the strategies are implemented optimizes contributions. We are approaching these questions through a cross-site comparison with two coffee cooperatives (one each in Mexico and Nicaragua), exploring the different effects of diversification strategies and how they relate to the sustainability of small-scale coffee production.

This project aims to inform a broad audience along the coffee value chain, and its participatory design aims to provide practical results that will lead to better decision making by producers (both farmers and cooperatives), and those seeking to provide investment and/or collaborate in projects that support their smallholder and cooperative suppliers. The study also offers a replicable research framework that can be applied in a diversity of contexts. Our presentation will provide key results and include the perspectives of coffee producers, cooperatives, buyers and researchers.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 251

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, RO - Retail Operators

Moderator: V. Ernesto Méndez, Professor of Agroecology, University of Vermont

Panelists: Janica Anderzén, PhD student, Agroecology & Livelihood Collaborative (ALC) - University of Vermont | Rigoberto Hernandez Jonapá, Project coordinator, CESMACH coffee cooperative, Mexico | Leticia Velasco, Farmer and board member of CESMACH, CESMACH coffee cooperative | Todd Caspersen, Director of Purchasing and Production, Equal Exchange

Meeting Global Clean Air Requirements

Lecture will inform specialty coffee roasters of rules that govern clean air requirements and review the major alternatives to meeting these requirements. It will also help roasters avoid the many mistakes which can lead to fines and possible revocation of a use permit.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 252A

Target Audience: RO - Roasters Operators, R - Roasters, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Ron Kleist, President of VortX KleanAir Systems Inc. | Willem Boot, Vice President Sales and Marketing, VortX KleanAir Systems Inc.

How You Can Use Big Data to Alter Future Farming and Policy

New human-centered technologies will change farming and policy strategies for managing risks and climate to accelerate resilient growth. COSA is working with global partners to create a novel, web-based decision-support system (DSS) that democratizes access to important global data and integrates it with critical local-level data to generate new levels of resilience and long-term viability.

The advent of big data offers vast potential. Greater scale and reduced costs can be achieved by addressing the risks within a whole region. However, it is only when big data is integrated with local pragmatic realities, and made accessible to those who can act, that the benefits really multiply.

From policymakers to farmers, this transformative technology really engages local coffee communities across a landscape or region and empowers diverse stakeholders to mutually understand and resolve large landscape-scale issues and produce broad collective results.

Tested successfully with a consortium of businesses (SCA, Starbucks, Keurig, Farmer Bros. S&D, CounterCulture, etc.) and leading agencies (USDA, IDB, and Conservation International) with community organizations, we want to fully scale the concept to offer:

  • Vital information that allows policymakers and farmers to choose varieties better
  • Perspectives on deforestation or water AND understanding the drivers to improve
  • Assess the global spread of crop pests and diseases to minimize impact on yields.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 253C

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Daniele Giovannucci, President of Committee on Sustainability Assessments | Michael Shean, USDA Director of (ret.), USDA

Teikei Sailed Coffee: A Comprehensive Model of Sustainability and Community Supported and Associative Economy

The concept of "Teikei" or "Community Supported Agriculture" (CSA) is used in different countries as a way of people that come together to jointly finance agriculture. It is used for local products but now we are extrapolating the model to be used in a commodity like coffee, with all its challenges but also opportunities. We are already doing it with Mexican producers and European consumers of specialty coffee, that is been produced with ecological practices. The coffee is being transported on sailed boat from Mexico to Hamburg, Germany. Once in Europe, it is being roasted and distributed in a social model to consumers affiliated to CSA groups. The model and concept is based on dialogue, transparency, respect, and organic agriculture. We are studing seriusly the costs of production and the needs of the producers and all other individuals and organizations involved in the coffee chain. We are re-defining the concept of price and trade, building relationships that care for people and the environment.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 254A

Target Audience: B - Baristas, RO - Retail Operators, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Diego Porras, Anthropologist, Ensambles Cafes Mexicanos

The Neglected Third Pillar of Sustainability

To be deemed sustainable, the three pillars of social responsibility, economic viability, and environmental soundness must all work together to create a balance. However, in agricultural crops such as coffee, environment often takes a backseat to people and profit. Coffee is a highly traded commodity, grown in tropical regions of the world that also host high levels of biodiversity. It covers millions of hectares of land with millions of livelihoods intertwined with its production. The way that coffee farms are managed can vary widely– from a monoculture of coffee plants with little or no shade trees (sun coffee) to farms with many types of trees interspersed between the coffee plants (shade coffee). Shade coffee provides habitat for wildlife, fosters ecosystem services, requires few agrochemicals, and is better overall for the environment compared to sun coffee. Even with these benefits, there is a trend to replace shade coffee with sun coffee. How can these three pillars of sustainability be more equally balanced to not only produce a profitable crop, but also protect the environment on which wildlife and people depend? This talk will explore some of the difference between shade and sun coffee and the complexities and nuances in defining sustainability.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 252A

Target Audience: CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers, R - Roasters, B - Baristas, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Amanda Caudill, Ecologist/Research Scientist, Columbia University

Coffee & Collaboration: A Success Story from Peru

In 2015 a number of partners, all with a passion for Peruvian coffee, began conversations about the increasing challenge of securing coffee supply from this unique origin. As one of the first exporters of certified coffee from Peru, Twin knew about the severity of the issues facing its producer partners: Leaf Rust had decimated up to 80% of production in certain areas, and erratic weather patterns were increasing. For UK retailer Marks and Spencer, this was a key risk – Peruvian coffee formed a significant part of both its retail and café offering. And so began the conversation, between producer organisations, Marks and Spencer, two seemingly ‘competitive’ roasters – Matthew Algie and Taylors of Harrogate – and Twin, a non-profit coffee Trader and NGO. The conversation was the start of a three year, collaborative and holistic programme that looked at climate change as the critical issue but that avoided a narrow environmental focus – instead looking at the interrelated issues of gender justice and youth engagement. Fast forward three years, and partners have learnt a huge amount from looking at the value chain in a completely different and more collaborative way. This lecture will hear from all partners, including Peruvian producers, about what has been learnt; sharing what we think can be a blue-print for sustainable change in coffee.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 253A

Target Audience: CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, P - Producers, R - Roasters, T - Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Moderator: Hannah Ward

Panelists: Ewan Reid, Managing Director, Matthew Algie | Esperanza Diionisio Castillo, General Manager, CAC Pangoa, Peru | Krisztina Szalai, Sustainable Sourcing Manager, Taylors of Harrogate | Hazel Culley, Sustainability Manager, Marks and Spencer

Translation Available: English to Spanish, Spanish to English

SCIENCE & INNOVATION

FRIDAY, APRIL 12

Drip Coffee Brewing and the Coffee Brewing Control Chart

The process for brewing coffee appears simple: one pours hot water over some coffee grounds, and then drinks the liquid that passes through a filter. This superficial perspective, however, belies a sequence of complicated physical and chemical processes that govern the quality of the resulting beverage. In this lecture, we discuss the origins of the "Coffee Brewing Control Chart" that is widely used to interpret the quality of drip brew coffee. We discuss how several implicit assumptions in the derivation of the chart yield questionable interpretations in current practice. Furthermore, we discuss several unanswered questions regarding drip coffee brewing that are the subject of ongoing sustained research efforts at the UC Davis Coffee Center.

Time: 9:00am- 10:00am

Room: 253B

Target Audience: B - Baristas, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): William Ristenpart, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Director of the UC Davis Coffee Center, University of California Davis

Cosmos Coffee - Special Exhibition at Deutsches Museum

The Deutsches Museum is the largest science and technology museum with 1.5M visitors/a. As curator, I realized the upcoming special exhibition "Cosmos Coffee", which stages the craft and science behind coffee (Botany, Chemistry, Technology, Economy, Culture), with interactive elements (VR plantation, roasting demo, laboratory) on 15000 sq ft. The aim is to make the diverse topics surrounding coffee accessible to a wider public and to make them reflect and rethink their daily consumption of coffee - bearing in mind how many lives around the globe have always depended on this valuable product and still do today. And how many people it takes to make coffee as great as it can sometimes be.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 252A

Target Audience: R - Roasters, R - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Sara Marquart, Food Chemist, Deutsches Museum

Genetic Restriction on Coffee Quality in Brazil and Agronomic Institute (IAC) Contribution to Improve the Competitiveness

Coffee quality depends on several factors from seed to cup, including environmental, genetic constitution of varieties and technological procedures in coffee production.

Brazil is the biggest coffee producer but only few varieties from narrow genetic basis are used in commercial production. Since the coffee variety is an important factor that contribute to define the sensory profile expression in each producer region, it is necessary to evaluate the variety performance in specific environmental to understand the major effects on coffee quality aiming to recommend the better ones for specialty coffee production in Brazil. Preliminary results obtained in field experiments carried out by Specialty Coffee Research Program at Agronomic Institute (IAC), in Sao Paulo estate, Brazil, revealed that is possible to produce so differentiated specialty coffee by using Yellow Bourbon genotypes, F1 Hybrids and ancient varieties from Africa and India available in Germplasm Bank at IAC. These results could be interesting to improve the Specialty Coffee Production and confirm the importance of coffee variety in determining the cup quality and sensory profile.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 254A

Target Audience: P - Producers, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Gerson Silva Giomo, Agronomist Engineer - Scientific Researcher, IAC-Instituto Agronômico de Campinas

Gerson Silva Giomo, Agronomist Engineer - Scientific Researcher, IAC-Instituto Agronômico de Campinas

A New Descriptive Terminology For the Brewing Control Chart – How to Maximize the Flavor Potential of Your Brewed Coffee

The original brewing control chart is overlaid with acceptability zones describing cup flavors. However, these terminologies (strong, bitter, weak, over and under-developed) are outdated and their definitions are not standardized in the industry. In this lecture, the newest results from the UC Davis Coffee Center will be presented, which used the WCR Sensory Lexicon in order to elucidate new flavor attributes related to coffees of different strengths and extractions.

The experiment evaluated a single origin coffee roasted to three different development times in order to assess the importance of roast on the flavor at different strengths and extractions. The position of the coffees on the brewing control chart was modified by using a programmable batch brewer. A descriptive analysis panel was used to capture the sensory profile of these coffees. The results presented will be used to update the descriptive zones of the new brewing control chart. Lecture attendees will learn how flavor can be modified through the brewing process, and how the control chart can be used to create different flavors for a specific coffee. Join us for this lecture to learn how to target and adjust the flavor attributes of a coffee and dial in your batch brew.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 253C

Target Audience: B - Baristas, R - Roasters, T- Rerail Operators, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Scott Frost, Postdoctoral Scholar, University of California, Davis

How Blockchain Will Disrupt Your Coffee’s Value Chain for Good

Blockchain technology has the potential to completely disrupt the coffee value chain as we know it. And it has already started. Global brands like Walmart and Starbucks are exploring the use of blockchain in tracing food and beverage products for quality control and veracity of origin.

But there is a potentially bigger opportunity for this emerging technology in a global coffee market that is unsustainable. Blockchain can give more coffee producers the opportunity to know their coffee’s end customer and value. Opening up these connections and knowledge is helping producers in Guatemala start making a profit for the first time in 4 years.

Understand what this new technology means for your coffee supply chain. Panelists include Scott Tupper (Founder of Onda Origins and Yave), Arthur Karuletwa (former Director of Traceability at Starbucks) and Kat Nolte (Coffee Trader and Sustainability Coordinator at SUCAFINA).

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 252A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Moderator: Scott Tupper, Founder of Onda Origins & Yave

Panelists: Arthur Karuletwa, Independent consultant, former Director of Traceability at Starbucks | Kat Nolte, Coffee Trader & Sustainability Coordinator, SUCAFINA | Michael Wood

How Many Coffee Farms Are There in the World?

There are many sustainability initiatives, current and future, that seek to address social, economic and environmental challenges in the coffee sector. A critical underpinning to scientific inquiry in this arena is an accurate estimate of coffee farm populations and characteristics by origin. However, to our knowledge there has never been a rigorous undertaking to answer this question. Commonly cited estimates of 20-25 million farms rely upon a self-reported exercise by coffee nations 20 years ago, whose original source data, definitions and methods have been lost to history.

Such a large (in scope) and rigorous assessment of the coffee farm population has not been carried out before. We present a robust, methodologically-consistent data set of productivity and farm size estimates, and also summarize the main characteristics of coffee producers in 20 major countries. Finally, the study answers the fundamental question – “how many coffee farms are there in the world?” with a new estimate that can underpin future research and policy work.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 252A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): David Browning, CEO, Enveritas

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

Producers Ask, “What Variety Should I Plant?” WCR Answers.

The first question any farmer, who has decided to farm coffee, has to ask is "What kind of coffee?" Should they plant Arabica or Robusta? If they want to plant Arabica, what variety? Where can they source seeds that are genetically pure? World Coffee Research is building infrastructure and the decision-making tool to help with these questions, and Kraig Kraft will break down the support WCR is offering these farmers -- and how it helps buyers, importers and roasters everywhere.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 251

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders

Presenter(s): Kraig Kraft, Global Programs Director, World Coffee Research

Sensory and Chemical Explorations into Drip Brew Coffee Flavor Over Time

At the UC Davis Coffee Center, we are engaged in comprehensive sensory research using trained panel descriptive analysis to investigate how different parameters related to coffee brewing impact the flavor, and how these can be manipulated to an individual's desired effect. Of these factors, time can be an important variable—in multiple ways—and this talk will highlight two recent projects.

The first investigated the time-evolution of coffee flavor extraction during the brewing process. By dividing a drip brew into eight parts and evaluating the flavor change every 30 seconds, we offer a more detailed picture of observable extraction changes. The second experiment investigated time elapsed post-brew, comparing how quickly perceptible changes occur when coffee is held in a carafe, in order to understand the stability of flavors depending on holding conditions. Both of these studies offer preliminary data that can be immediately useful to the industry in developing and preserving desired flavors in the coffee brewing process.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 253C

Target Audience: B - Baristas, RO - Retail Operators, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Mackenzie Batali, Graduate Student Researcher, University of California, Davis

Sensory Analysis and Quality Grading: A Comparison

Coffee has historically been evaluated by the cupping system, but recently Descriptive Analysis techniques have come to the forefront. How do these two grading systems differ, what benefits does each offer, and how do we select the right tool for the job? This talk will explore the origins and definitions of sensory science and quality grading, as well as offer practical tips on how to customize a tasting protocol according to your company’s needs. Integrating principles of sensory science into your tasting practices can enable you get the best data possible with the resources at your disposal, enabling your company to maximize product quality and minimize risk.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 254B

Target Audience: RO - Retail Operators, R - Roasters, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Olivia Auell, Sensory Scientist II, Synergy Flavors

The Science of Coffee Freshness

Coffee freshness is one of the core values of specialty coffee. But why is preserving the freshness so important? We maybe strive to maximize coffee’s potential to keep its vibrancy as fresh as the day when roasted or we keep coffee fresh to ensure quality and consistency. For any reason that we want to keep coffee fresh, understanding the fundamentals of freshness and applying them in our daily routine will help to improve our cup of coffee. In this lecture we will explore the topics of roasted coffee freshness as seen by a scientist’s perspective. Two particular fields will be looked into detail: chemical freshness or loss of coffee aroma during coffee aging, and physical freshness or degassing (also called outgassing) of coffee, a process of gradual gas release after coffee roasting.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 253B

Target Audience: RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, R - Roasters, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Samo Smrke, Scientific Associate, Zurich University of Applied Sciences

Elucidating the Bitter Taste of Coffee

Coffee shows an appealing bitterness when properly roasted and prepared. But how do the compounds that make coffee taste bitter develop during roasting and how do you analyse and identify them? What lessons can be learned from academic research on coffee roasting to make coffee even more pleasantly bitter-tasting? And after a century of intensive research, why does research still not know exactly what makes coffee bitter at all?

  • An excerpt of the academic research during my time as PhD at TU Munich.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 253B

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, B - Baristas, RO - Retail Operations, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Sara Marquart, Food Chemist, Deutsches Museum

Securing Consistent Cup Quality Over Longer Periods: A Novel Treatment for Green Coffee

Even when stored under adequate conditions, aging of green coffee results in the decline of its original quality. For producers, exporters, importers and traders of specialty coffee this can represent significant losses, given the close price-cupping score interrelation. General knowledge within the coffee community indicates that the rate at which this negative progression occurs differs among varieties and processing methods. To explore and address this, a spin-off from the TU Berlin called coffee, metrics & analytics (coma) developed a novel pressure treatment to preserve flavor and aromatic compounds over longer periods.

In 2018 coma kicked off an experiment comparing the rate of decline in the cupping score of samples from two lots: a Tanzanian fully washed Kent variety and an Ethiopian Heirloom natural. Coma conducts the experiment in collaboration with two specialty roasteries in Germany and one specialty trader in Norway. For each variety, half of the samples were subjected to the new treatment while half remained unprocessed. All samples are stored under business-as-usual conditions at the roasters’ and sourcer’s premises, and are cupped at regular intervals to evaluate the evolution of cupping score and biophysical components. This lecture will introduce the new pressure treatment and present preliminary experiment results.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 254A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Francisco Velázquez Escobar, Research leader and cofounder of coffee, metrics & analytics, Technische Universität Berlin | Gerardo Anzaldúa, Fellow, Ecologic Institute in Berlin

SUNDAY, APRIL 14

Spent Coffee Grounds – Valorisation Beyond the Lab Bench

Spent coffee grounds (SCGs) are the waste product generated from coffee beverage preparation and at least 6 million tonnes of SCGs end up in landfill each year. The accruement of SCGs in nature is an increasingly persistent problem for the environment and human health due to the ecotoxicity and cytotoxicity of secondary metabolites within coffee. Over the last decade, a large research effort has been underway, in line with EU directives to reduce to the tonnage of waste sent to landfill, maximising value and reducing the environmental impact of the coffee industry. To this end, academic research has demonstrated the suitability of SCGs as a potential source of bulk chemicals, fuels and products. However, the practical utilisation of SCGs as a renewable feedstock for processes remains problematic.

This talk will introduce the chemical composition of SCGs and give an overview of the fuels, materials, functional food and skincare products that can be generated from them. It will critically examine the state-of-the-art in research to constructing an SCGs based biorefinery, including the logistics involved, and will attempt to demonstrate the limitations of this approach. The necessary future direction of valorising the by-products of the coffee processing industry will also be highlighted.

Time: 9:00am- 10:00am

Room: 252B

Target Audience: T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Jackie Massaya, PhD Researcher, University of Bath

Genetic Improvement of Cup Quality: Latest Developments

World Coffee Research is working to improve the genetic potential of coffee cup quality. To start this task, one has to define what is quality. WCR believes it is a market driven definition and organized new protocols to assess quality from the perspective of the coffee industry. With experts and partners, WCR produced the coffee lexicon that allows an objective analytic description of coffee quality attributes. In our presentation, we will discuss these innovations and indicate lessons learned. Moreover, the latest results deriving from these methods and advances on the molecular basis of cup quality will be presented. In particular, the importance of some specific Volatile Compounds, such as Limonene, will be highlighted. Those results are not an end but a beginning; an opportunity for further studies to find out the molecular markers or genes related to cup quality in general. Ongoing works are presented and perspectives for coffee industry will be discussed.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 53A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Christophe Montagnon, Scientific Director, World Coffee Research

The Impact of Water Quality on Espresso Chemistry

The work presented here enabled us to understand how water chemistry controls the flavours being extracted during espresso percolation. As a result, we can now predict the precise filtration systems required to achieve ideal water chemistry based on our filtration model. This enables us to ensure consistent extraction flavour across Australia despite highly varying water qualities.

Currently, filtration systems are installed to limit machine corrosion and to achieve flavour consistency between cafes. The challenge to correctly installing filtration systems is that feed water varies from location to location. The task is further complicated when attempts are made to link filtration results to a coffee flavour variation. Our work bridges this gap.

In collaboration with the University of New South Wales (Australia), we developed a predictive model to aid in obtaining the best quality espresso possible as a function of feed water quality. To achieve this, we measured the effects of various filters on water chemistry and developed a model that predicted filtered water chemistry as a function of filter type, size and feed water quality. We then measured the impacts of water quality on espresso chemistry using a variety of tools, including inductively coupled plasma spectrometry and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 253C

Target Audience: B - Baristas, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Dr. Adam Carr, Coffee Science and Education Centre Manager, Seven Miles Coffee Roasters

coffee farming & processing

friday, april 12

In order to understand all of the new and exciting coffee processing trends that are occurring around the world, it helps to first understand the science and theory behind those methods. Dig into the science behind (or lack thereof) emerging and experimental processing trends in this fun lecture aimed at anyone who would like to finally get some clarity around processing jargon. In this lecture, Emma Sage and Dr. Mario Fernández of the Coffee Quality Institute will share their experience and scientific knowledge to guide you through this complex topic. The latest scientific research will be highlighted, common processing myths will be busted, and the newest processing trends will be analyzed through a critical scientific lens.

If you have you ever wondered – • What is the difference between “golden honey” and pulp natural? • How are producers accomplishing Lactic fermentation, and how does it impact flavor? • What are the differences between the yeasts, bacteria, and fungi that contribute to coffee fermentations? • Why you must use African beds to dry specialty coffee? • What are the risks and advantages of utilizing commercial yeasts? • What is carbonic maceration of wine and how is it applied to coffee? Then this lecture is for you!

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 252A

Target Audience: P - Producers, T- Traders, R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, P - Producers, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Emma Sage, Technical Services Manager, Coffee Quality Institute | Dr. Mario Fernández Alduenda, Technical Director, Coffee Quality Institute

Direct Trade: Managing Expectations of all Sides of the Transaction

In a six act scripted interaction a buyer and farmer walk into and out of the most classic pitfalls of starting a direct trade relationship. At the end of each act, there will be a quick review of what was agreed upon and what the next steps should be. In the end the business will be done, but not before prices are adjusted, logistics ironed out, and expectations come down to earth. Matt and Byron will use their current jobs to role play the interaction for the audience using real pictures from the farm and an actual coffee lot as it moves through the process from the farm to the roasters warehouse.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 251

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters

Presenter(s): Matt Swenson, Director of Coffee, Chameleon Cold Brew | Byron Holcomb, Director of Agribusiness, FAL Coffee & Nobletree Coffee

Coffee Fermentation by Carbonic Maceration: Study of the Quality Improvement and Physicochemical Changes

During 2017 coffee harvest, a fermentation process inspired on carbonic maceration of grapes was carried out with coffee cherries. The process was done at laboratory scale and showed a great improvement on sensorial quality. In order to determine the best fermentation time, other tests were carried out at 22 and 35°C, withdrawing samples at every 24 hours. On these processes the coffee had the best improvement of quality by the 6th day (both temperatures) when the SCA grades increased from 78.1 (no fermentation process) to 86.4 and 86.6 (22 and 35°C, respectively).

Based on this great quality jump, during 2018 harvest, the maceration process was studied in 2 farms of Brazil, one producing commodity and other specialty coffee. We carried out 3 fermentation processes, collecting coffee cherries at every 24 hours to study chemical and microbiological kinetics. Besides that, 12 other processes were done, up to 6 days of fermentation, testing different coffee species and varieties to verify improvement of quality. All the samples were sent to sensorial analysis with 3 Q-graders, and the grades of coffees were used to select samples to characterize the physicochemical properties of fermented coffee, as sugar amount, acidity, electric conductivity and volatile compounds.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 253A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Ana Valéria Ulhano Braga, Ms. in Food Technology, University of Campinas (UNICAMP) | Flavio Luís Schmidt, Dr. Food Technology, University of Campinas (UNICAMP)

Moderator: TBD


SATURDAY, APRIL 13

The Real Cost of Coffee Farming - and What Women are Doing About it

Coffee farmers have been reeling from increasing costs of production and certifications, as well as the impact of climate change and low coffee prices. While the coffee industry has been working to understand and determine the cost of producing coffee, this doesn't take into account the total cost of living for coffee farmers. We'll hear from coffee co-op leaders and Food 4 Farmers about what it takes to cover the cost of growing coffee plus all the necessities - food, education, housing, and other day-to-day expenses -- that make living on coffee alone so difficult for millions of small-scale producers. We'll learn about strategies they're developing to help small coffee farming families thrive in the face of these challenges.

Time: 9:00am- 10:00am

Room: 252B

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Marcela Pino, Co-Director, Food 4 Farmers

Presenter(s): Fatima Ismael, General Manager, UCA SOPPEXCCA | Luz Chacon, President, Asociacion Nuevo Futuro | Siliva Roblero Torres, Cesmach

Do Good Labor Practices Lead to Better Quality Coffee?

We know that investing in good labor conditions for farm workers is the right thing to do for their health and welfare. And it protects companies against supply chain risks. But does it correlate to improved coffee quality? Do farm workers who have good housing, education and wages do a better job at ensuring high coffee quality? What does the data show?

Solidaridad, Counter Culture Coffee, Rainforest Alliance and Conservation International, in partnership with the SCA and as part of the Sustainable Coffee Challenge are working to better understand this relationship. We will discuss what is needed to draw these correlations, what the literature shows to date, and the initial findings from an externally commissioned research study. We will also explore what a cost-benefit approach to promoting good labor conditions looks like, discuss which labor conditions can deliver return on investment and which ones are important but would need support beyond the industry.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 252B

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Bambi Semroc

Presenter(s): Andrea Olivar, International Programme Manager Coffee, Solidaridad | TBD

Coffee Processing and the Future of Specialty: How Innovations in Processing Can Change Perceptions of Specialty Coffee

In this lecture, former World Barista Champion Saša Šestić presents his findings from years of experimental planning and processing on coffee farms. This lecture aims to show that recent innovations and developments in coffee processing and farming will inevitably change our perception of what is both 'specialty' and high-quality coffee.

Saša's various experiments with producers around the world, as well as on his own farms in Nicaragua and Honduras have explored the opportunity of creating exceptional coffee with low-scoring, 'common' and under-valued varietals, typically considered outside the domain of 'specialty' coffee.

This lecture will also explore the cost of such findings, revealing the challenges and losses faced in the journey to increasing quality, production and sustainability in a commercial environment.

In this lecture, Saša will also address questions such as:

  • "How do we turn commerically-grown habitats and farms into something more sustainable?;
  • "Can low-altitude coffee reach the same cup quality of high-altitude coffee? How?";
  • and "In the wake of these experiments and others, what does the future of specialty coffee look like?"

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 254B

Target Audience: RO- Retail Operators, P - Producers, T - Traders, B - Baristas

Presenter(s): Saša Šestić, CEO, ONA Coffee / Founder, Project Origin

SUNDAY, APRIL 14

Unpacking the Costs of Specialty Coffee Farming in Colombia

This lecture will present the findings of a Master's Project team at the University of Michigan in service of their client, Califia Farms. The Master's Project team consists of four MBA/MS students (Kathy Tian, Dan Partin, Madeleine Carnemark, Lauren Baum) who are advised by Ravi Anupindi, the Colonel William G. and Ann C. Svetlich Professor of Operations Research and Management at the Ross School of Business. The team will do a detailed break down the cost of specialty coffee production in Colombia, as well as their discoveries on cost of living and savings. They will present their perspective on how a coffee roaster can develop a pricing standard to ensure a fair and sustainable price to the producer. Since the team's field research was conducted in Manizales, Caldas, findings will be centered around Colombia, but the team will also discuss implications of their research on pricing standards in other countries.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 254A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Kathy Tian, MBA/MS Student (Erb Institute), University of Michigan | Lauren Baum, MBA/MS Student (Erb Institute), University of Michigan

roasting & retailing

Friday, April 12

Scaling Wholesale Training and Execution

Hear from industry stalwarts whom have “Bean there, done that, but I know I’ve got to evolve or die!” to share you real world experiences and programs to help you gain insights into the illusive question … “How do I grow my wholesale program?”

Worried about letting your beans leave your care? Learn about why using the right distributor might just be the thing you need. Gain insight on how working with the right distributor can enhance your overall growth.

Vetting potential new Wholesale Customers to find the best ways to grow your company. Learn from Industry Professionals proven ways to evaluate equipment needs vs pound volume. Learn how programs are developed in wholesale that promote coffee freshness. Learn Away from Home Coffee Beverage trends which assist in ensuring capacity for different beverage types using cross functional equipment. Learn Calculations to understand and maximize equipment investments Learn how Coffee Roaster/Retailers have developed great Training Components to grown their Wholesale Customers which are implementing repeatable process in training and quality assurance. Training programs that are the foundation for them growing their Wholesale business

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 253C

Target Audience: R - Roasters, R - Retail Operators

Moderator(s): Maria Cleaveland, Sales Director, Western USA & Canada, Urnex Brands

Panelists: Panelist #1: Tarra Samuelson, LA Area Manager & Specialty Sales Representative, Equator Coffees & Teas | Karalynn McDermott, Sr. Vice President Market Development, BUNN | Caleb Peterson, Sales and Market Development Representative, Stumptown Coffee Roasters | Melanie Marken, National Director of Sales, Sun Coffee Roasters | Amy Loius, President & CoFounder, Six Degrees Coffee and Distribution | Sara Dooley, Director of Customer Success, Slayer Espresso

Developing a Brand Language: Thoughts on Branding, Design & Visual Communication

A brand identity is more then a logo & good packing; it's the visual representation of your entire company. In this lecture we will discuss the importance of good, consistent design and how it can help businesses grow and better communicate their brand to their audience.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 252B

Target Audience: R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas

Presenter(s): Dave Imber, Director of Development, VCI | David Gurr, Art Director, VCI

Starting A Coffee Shop But Feeling Unqualified?

Many of us have a dream to open up our own retail shop, yet have no idea where to begin. There are few resources online, and few owners that are available to talk about their story and how they got to where they’re at. That’s very much how we felt when we were three friends who wanted to start a coffee shop with no coffee experience at all.

We’ll walk through how we got started, and helpful resources that moved us forward along the way. We’ll share how a simple idea sparked an adventure into the world of craft coffee, to learning how to write a business plan, look for locations, build out our space, open and successfully get through our first year. Although every story is different, we hope to provide an inside look into our journey, the contributing elements of our success, and a touch of the day-to-day reality of being a coffee shop owner in today’s third-wave coffee scene.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 253B

Target Audience: R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Julia Minayeva, Co-owner, SONDER Coffee & Tea

Consumer Desire Along Roast Degree- What Do Specialty Coffee Drinkers Actually Want From Us?

Using hard data we collect on customer feedback and SKU performance at Trade, we would like to present our findings to the Specialty Coffee Industry. Trade is unique in that we are the only company with this kind of tracking capability- and in short, we are seeing consumers want Naturally processed coffee and coffees with longer development, butting up to 2nd crack. It challenges the programs we see within many specialty roasters, and we would like to provide insight into gaining more customers, being more approachable with our coffee, and how to pump money back into the industry without compromising integrity. Is the next trend for customers a well-developed dark roast? What stops us as an industry from achieving that/ providing our customer base with that option? How do we thoughtfully push development in roast profiles? Does this mean we can continue to buy relationship coffees even in hard harvest years, so money goes to the producer AND have avenues to sell these coffees to consumers? The answer is yes, and being more inclusive with our offerings will help specialty thrive in the face of the climate and socio-economic/ political challenges the industry faces.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 254B

Target Audience: R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Erika Vonie, Director of Coffee, Trade Coffee Company

Coffee Evaluation Systems - There's More Than the 100 Points

The industry standard system for evaluating coffee is the 100 point scale. This seminar will offer an overview of quality and its evaluation, explore the pros and cons of the 100 point system and discuss other systems in currently being used.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 251

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T - Traders, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Shawn Steiman, Coffee scientists and consultant, Coffea Consulting

How to do Coffee & Booze Equally Amazingly

We're prone to classify our favorite spots into neat categories. We may have our favorite cocktail bar and our favorite coffee shop, but what keeps us from returning to our favorite coffees shop for a Negroni in the evening? Is it possible for both coffee and alcohol to thrive in the space?

It takes a high degree of intentionality to create a space that serves both functions equally well. These spaces may take a variety of forms, but in order for them to succeed, every detail must be considered, from lighting, to music, to layout, to service approach.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 253C

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T - Traders, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: David Yake, Co- Founder, Camber Coffee

Panelists: Rowan Kapanui, Coffee Program Manager, Mr. West | Brandon Paul Weaver, Owner, Liberty Bar and Foreigner Coffee, Liberty Bar | Connie Mccoy, Front of House Manager, Vif

Saturday, April 13

Building Out a Roasting Plant: Managing the Minutiae

Presentation and panel question session about managing the design and build out of a roasting plant from start up to large operations. This presentation will review site and equipment selection criteria, design, process flow layout, HACCP, and timeline sequencing. We will discuss pitfalls and how to efficiently navigate their solutions.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 254B

Target Audience: CE - Coffee Enthusiasts, R - Roasters, RO- Retail Operators

Moderator: TBD

Presenter(s): Peter Lyons, Owner, Lyons' Pride Coffee | Andi Trindle Mersch, Director of Coffee and Sustainability, Philz Coffee | Mike Ebert, Owner, Firedancer Coffee Consultants | Brent Patton, Owner, Camino Real Roasters

Opening a Cafe - Design it Right, Build it Once

This powerpoint presentation will explore the most critical issues (and mistakes) owners face during the design and build-out process when opening a new café. Topics covered include: floor plan design, health and building codes, equipment needed to support your menu and time lines. The seminar will also examine ways to reduce build-out costs, improve employee efficiency and increase seating capacity. Since 1996, Tom Palm has worked with over 1000 clients interested in opening a new café. This is a must see seminar for anyone entering the specialty coffee business.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 251

Target Audience: B - Baristas, R - Roasters, RO- Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Tom Palm, President, Design Layout Services

Does Decaf Matter? (hint, yes!)

Decaf coffee sales are rising. Learn who really drinks decaf, why they drink it and best practices for how to use decaffeinated coffee to reach new customers to drive growth.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 252A

Target Audience: R - Roasters, T- Traders, B - Baristas

Presenter(s): Erin Reed, Directory of Marketing, Swiss Water Decaffeinated Coffee | David Kastle, Senior Vice President, Swiss Water Decaffeinated Coffee

The Opposite of SUCCESS is not FAILURE

Business owners often feel failure is the alternative to success. It's NOT! Coffee business owner, Andrew Gough, examines how failure graces all successful business endeavors through a very personal look into the operations of his coffee roaster/retailer, Reverie Coffee Roasters. So if failure isn't the opposite of success, what is? Come to learn his answer and to share your experiences with other coffee professionals who are all in the same boat. NET losses, debt, restructuring, mergers, partnerships, etc. It's part of the business life.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 253C

Target Audience: B - Baristas, R - Roasters, RO- Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Andrew Gough, President/Co-owner, Reverie Coffee Roasters

Training Principles for Specialty Coffee Professionals

As coffee quality becomes increasingly important in specialty coffee service, training becomes a critical component of a company’s long term success. This lecture provide coffee instructors with an overview on how to develop great content, deliver effective trainings, and successfully track employee performance. The workshop will benefit any coffee professional seeking to learn or hone training communication skills.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 252A

Target Audience: R - Roasters, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas

Presenter(s): Anne F. Nylander, Specialty Coffee Growth Strategist

SUNDAY, APRIL 14

Choosing Emission Control Equipment for Your Roaster

Emission standards and regulations are increasing more onerous and complicated. While many roasting companies are seeking "green" solutions for roaster operations, it is difficult to know if these solutions are compliant. In this presentation we will explore why emission regulations exist and how roasting operators comply with these regulations. We will also compare and contrast tried and true emission control equipment with newer, greener solutions.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 252A

Target Audience: R - Roasters, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Scott Stouffer, Vice President, Probat Inc.

The Yin to Your Yang: Understanding Why Specialty Tea Is an Essential Part of Any Third-Wave Coffee Shop

With millennials choosing tea equal to coffee, it is time to up the ante. Gone are the days where tea is an afterthought when curating your menu. Having a specialty tea program that matches the caliber of the rest of your offerings, one which is in alignment with the ethos of your mission, is not only crucial to remaining competitive and profitable but also a benchmark of quality. You will walk away from this talk understanding why offering sub-par tea is one of the biggest missed opportunities, why consumers are demanding premium tea, how little it takes to elevate your tea program, and what to look for in a specialty tea partner. You will learn how to restore balance in your menu to ensure your tea “yin” compliments your coffee “yang.”

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 254B

Target Audience: RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Maria Upspenski, Founder & CEO, The Tea Spot, Inc.

Exploration of the Art and Chemistry of Coffee Roasting

Exploring the art and chemistry of roasting and the conversion of green coffee precursors into flavor, color and bio activities. In addition, how the impact of different energy transfer methodologies, and their conductive & convective properties effect this process. This is what is happening in the bean during roasting, the chemical changes that occur that effect acidity, body and flavor perception. Identifying key constituents and chemical reactions:

  • Water
  • Cellulose (has thermal conduction medium)
  • Sugars (caramelization)
  • Acids (assorted)
  • Trigonelline

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 252B

Target Audience: R - Roasters, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Launtia Taylor, Firedancer Coffee Consultants | Karl Schmidt, Owner, Bean Assured

Your Coffee Data is Business Intelligence - Use it to Deliver Quality, Consistency and Control

The artisanal customer face of specialty coffee is real and supported by a complex supply chain and highly specialized production. One result, this business creates and collects a lot of information. Understanding what can be collected and how it can help coffee businesses is simpler than people think. It is also the first step towards gaining real benefits.

Business intelligence is already accessible to businesses of all sizes, it is easy to use and inexpensive. It helps remove guesswork for beginners and delivers new insights for experts. Knowing what it is and how it work delivers real value to everyone in the supply chain. This lecture presents, what business intelligence really is in plain language, how coffee professionals can learn, implement and benefit from it and why doing that is more important than ever.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 253B

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas

Presenter(s): Andreas Idl, CEO, Cropster GmbH

TRADING & COMMERCE

FRIDAY, APRIL 12

Coffee Prices to Volatile for you? Secure your business using Price Risk Management

This presentation will highlight the elevated levels of price volatility that the Specialty Coffee Industry endures on a daily basis, and the negative effect on profitability of not protecting against such pronounced price swings. This reality will be explained by a thorough recap of the global supply/demand balance for Coffee, an explanation of the various macroeconomic factors that affect expectations, and a description of how speculative forces influence price discovery in the worldwide Coffee market. This in depth analysis will include a summary of the bullish (higher price) and bearish (lower price) elements that may further stimulate Coffee Price Volatility; as well as a concise review of the tools available to everyone in the Coffee world to manage this ever present Risk.

Coffee Price Volatility is here to stay…it has never left us. For that reason, Price Risk Management is no longer a luxury, but a necessity. In essence, not protecting is Speculating.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 254A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Julio Sera, Vice President of Trading, INTL FC Stone Financial Inc.

Exchange is a Constant: Understanding & Evaluating Coffee Auctions

An exploration of auctioning in coffee and its relevance to the supply chain. Major changes in auctions in countries like Ethiopia, Kenya, and Tanzania will be directly addressed, as well as an examination of new developments in the Cup of Excellence competition and auction. Forthright analysis of the varying degrees of success for each of these formats will accompany historical perspectives.

Time: 9:00am- 10:00am

Room: 252B

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders

Presenter(s): Presenter #1: Darrin Daniel, Executive Director, Alliance for Coffee Excellence | Chris Kornman, Education & Lab Manager, The Crown: Royal Coffee Lab & Tasting Room*

Connecting farmers to consumers throught sharing economy and digital innovation

Coffee production in the field is in a digital transformation: the producer has avalaible digital tools to support decision making at the farm level. The next wave of this trend is a digital revolution in the way coffee is marketed, such as digital plataforms and block chain technology.

Through a practical case study of the Made in Farm platform, the idea of this lecture is to show how digital platforms will be the future of the commercialization of coffee, either in large volumes for traders, industries and roasters, ie in the own producers' coffee brand to final consumers.

Launched in 2017, Made in Farm is a digital platform that connects all the actors in the coffee chain promoting the integration between producers, cooperatives, traders, industries and final consumers through the commercialization of special coffee and commodities. In the first year, the platform supported more than 200 farmers to Market their coffee to 85% of the brazilian territory. More than 95 thousands bags of green coffee were sold, and Thousands of coffee packages were commercialized by farmers directly to end consumers. Digital platforms can help farmers and coffe buyers in any countries to connect directly and create new Market opportunities. In addition through blockchain it can create more transparency creating new links to know the stories and how the coffee have been produced. See more here youtu.be/OBAB0rM-Y20

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 251

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Cristiane Lourenço, Head of Food Chain Relations and Sustainability, Bayer

Demystifying Foreign Supplier Verification - FSVP

The first major compliance date for importers covered by the Foreign Supplier Verification Programs (FSVP) rule arrived on May 30, 2017. FSVP is mandated by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). A central tenet of that law is that the same preventive food safety standards apply to food consumed in the U.S., regardless of where the food is produced.

Two years later and there is still confusion - what do you need to do?

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 254B

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders

Presenter(s): Mike Ebert, Founder - Senior Consultant, Firedancer Coffee Consultants

Scaling your Business for Success – How to Apply Rapid Growth Strategies to your Business

Steve Jobs once stated, “I’m always amazed how overnight successes take a helluva long time.” Many entrepreneurs have a vision of success and simply need a road map to a as to make their dreams come true. The coffee industry is filled with stories of successful rapid growth including high profile companies such as Starbucks, Costa Coffee and Keurig. There are also many less visible companies that have experienced incredible growth over the years.

This growth didn’t just happen by accident. There are key principles in each of these growth stories by focusing on people, strategy, execution and cash. This seminar will take participants through the importance of each of these aspects and how to achieve results oriented plans.

Understanding and implementing these factors to growth can allow your business to accelerate at a very rapid rate. Some of the companies we will discuss grew rapidly from the start while others were 10-20 years old before they started their rapid growth. It’s never too late to start accelerating your business.

Growing a business is an exciting time for a company and learning how to grow is just the beginning of the fun!

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 252B

Target Audience: R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators,

Presenter(s): Chris Legler, CEO and Founder, Evergreen Consulting

What Coffee Can Learn from the Development Industry's Mistakes (and successes!)

Doing good in coffee, whether in terms of sustainability or community development, requires going well beyond the parameters of a good roast or brewing coffee and excelling at customer service. Coffee farms are often in lower income countries and the coffee farming families that produce coffee and the social, economic and political structures around them are very complex. The aid / development community has developed standards of ethics / conduct as well as strategies and techniques for measuring the costs and benefits of intervention that could serve the coffee industry well if adapted and applied.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 252B

Target Audience: R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Jen Green, Founder, Little Black Drink | Drew Burnett, Director, Goodel*

Working together for the good of all: the social economy

This lecture is intended to stimulate debate and interest in what we believe to be the next big innovation for the social economy in the specialty coffee sector: multi-stakeholder international entities. We know of producer cooperatives who are very interested in this model and are keen to contribute from the audience.

In the current climate of consolidation, we are seeing that large corporations are acquiring smaller companies and producer cooperatives are seeking a path to continued development. So how can the social vision and inclusive ways of working established by pioneering companies & cooperatives be enhanced and guaranteed for the future? By the creation of an international multi stakeholder entity committed to sustainability.

We will examine how we can create alternative business models in which companies and cooperatives with commitment to sustainability e.g. Fairtrade, B-Corps and producer membership, can participate in something bigger, and look at the potential benefits and the challenges. We will consider how multi-stakeholder co-operation can be strengthened to grow and scale up.

We will consider why we believe that now is the moment to act, and the leadership models needed to scale up effectively.

Time: 2:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 254A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Albert Tucker, Chairperson, Social Business Network | Nicholas Hoskyns, Managing Director, ETICO - The Ethical Trading Company Ltd.

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

Why the New York "C" Contract is Relevent: Sorting Fact and Fiction

The New York Arabica futures market is frequently the victim of blame for weak coffee prices, heightened volatility and all else that ails the global coffee trade. Much of this comes from not understanding the mechanics and function of the market and simply echoing negative sentiment from misleading media reports. This presentation will help to debunk some of the common myths and to give attendees a clearer picture to help them make more informed decisions in their businesses and learn how to benefit from the market instead of eschewing it.

Time: 9:00am- 10:00am

Room: 253B

Target Audience: P- Producers, R - Roasters, T - Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): Judith Gaines, President, J Ganes Consulting, LLC

The Benefits of Being a Benefit Corporation

Success in business has evolved – from the singular 1970s and ‘80s purpose of delivering maximum stakeholder value to a higher-level purpose that accounts for value to local communities, employees, the environment and the world at large, while still delivering stakeholder value. Certified B Corporations are for-profit businesses that have been verified by B Lab, a nonprofit organization, to meet rigorous standards for verified social and environmental performance, public transparency, legal accountability, and aspire to use the power of markets to solve social and environmental problems. The B Corp movement has helped create the framework of good corporate citizenship – so all for-profit businesses can be a force for good, and strive to become even better.

This facilitated panel of coffee roasters, retailers and allied product producers will discuss their various pathways to attaining B Corp Certification and explore the value their businesses received from joining this global movement of people using business as a force for good.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 253B

Target Audience: P- Producers, R - Roasters, T - Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas

Moderator: TBD

Panelists: Melanie Dulbecco, CEO, Torani | TBD

The Yin and Yang of Managing Coffee Price Volatility Risk

The Price Risk Management (PRM) project equips 22 coffee cooperatives in Latin America with best-practice skills and PRM tools, reaching approximately 29,000 smallholder cooperative members. The project aims to achieve a change of attitude about how risk must be faced and tackled.

This unique training, conducted over the past two years, combines hard and soft training skills to focus on building common knowledge and understanding of the management of the coffee trading business at origin – then, systematizes the business using monitoring tools that manage producer cooperatives’ commercial and financial strategies. Once a cooperative has built knowledge of and manages its physical strategies using internal tools and policies, it can complement its physical strategy with a financial strategy in the derivatives market (futures/options) and manage the two together – like yin and yang.

The lecture will cover this yin-yang theory and be presented using the same methodology that guides the project’s implementation. Additional themes presented include (1) trends in management of price exposure across 22 Latin American coffee cooperatives; (2) key assertions and preliminary monitoring results of the project’s impact in cooperatives’ policies, governance, and risk; and (3) (3) the role of social lenders to understand and develop products to support financial strategies for price volatility mitigation.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 254A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders,CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Frank Rubio, Global Head of Agriculture, Oikocredit

Panelists: Hugo Villela, Regional Agri-Business Specialist for Latin America, Oikocredit | Sara Morrocchi, Founder of Vuna Origin Consulting | Diédericks Gadea, Financial Services Manager Aldea Global

Global Investment Opportunities In Coffee

Since its establishment in 1986, the USDA Food for Progress (FFPr) program has helped developing countries and emerging democracies modernize and strengthen their agricultural sectors by increasing agricultural productivity and expanding markets and trade. Current investments in coffee exceed $90 million dollars across several countries.

The future of coffee remains uncertain. Coffee plants are aging and yielding fewer beans, and climate change is threatening the productivity of farms and increasing the risk of devastating diseases. Presently, coffee leaf rust has devastated Latin America’s small family farms. This fungal disease has caused more than $1 billion in crop losses in Central America and removed 1.7 million jobs across all of Latin America. Despite recurring challenges of coffee diseases, price volatility, and other constraints, global coffee consumption has grown by over 11 percent in the past four years and coffee investment opportunities, particularly in the specialty coffee market segment, are promising for producers and consumers. USDA proposes a panel discussion to give the audience opportunities to directly engage and brainstorm global investment opportunities with industry experts through a series of thought-provoking questions.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 254A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: TBD

Panelists: Colleen B. Popkin, Senior Manager In Coffee Sustainability, Keurig Dr Pepper, Inc. | Raina Lang, Director of Sustainable Coffee Markets, Conservation International | Kraig H. Kraft, Agroecologist World Coffee Research

SUNDAY, APRIL 14

Power, Privilege amd Responsibility: The Socioeconomic Landscape Between Coffee Buyers and Producers

This panel discussion will provide a platform to explore the historical and current realities and challenges of the impact of the C Market trading system, the socioeconomic inequities at play between coffee producers and coffee buyers today and the power and, more importantly, the responsibility that coffee buyers have in driving change.

Panelists will represent a variety of viewpoints—producer, social anthropologist, importer, buyer and roaster—in order to communicate a well-rounded context for participants and more fully explore the topic and potential solutions.

The goal of the panel is to engage the audience (and specialty coffee industry at large) in a movement towards a new, sustainable trading model, one that levels the playing field and drives real, long-term change for coffee farmers.

Time: 9:00am-10:00am

Room: 254A

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, B - Baristas, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Moderator: Ed Canty, General Manager, Cooperative Coffees

Panelists: Dr. Carla Martin, Founder/Executive Director and Lecturer, Fine Cacao and Chocolate Institute and Harvard University | Esperanza Dionisio Castillo, General Manager, CAC Pangoa | Katie Carguilo, Quality Analyst and Coffee Buyer, Counter Culture Coffee | Caleb Nicholes, Owner and Coffee Buyer, Kickapoo Coffee Roasters

The Seven Seeds of Social Enterprise: Using Your Coffee Business for Social Good

Many business models in Specialty Coffee incorporate the ideas of working towards living wages for coffee growing communities. Seeing the movement around this empowering idea is so encouraging! But, it's also just the beginning... If we can improve the working conditions of coffee growers around the world, how can we do this in other aspects of our business as well? I see a new type of business model where we can not only better the lives of the people we source from, but also the lives of our employees, customers, and even our competition.

Time: 10:15am-11:15am

Room: 251

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators

Presenter(s): David Gaines, Chief Visionary, La Terza Coffee

We Have Been Here Before: Why the History of Coffee Matters Today

A presentation and discussion of past coffee crises and attempts to remedy the situation. We will examine the nature of previous crises, the fundamental imbalances that underpin them, and the efforts of various authorities to mitigate them. We will cover the history of commodity trading in New York, the history of the C price, and why large sums invested by traders are necessary to move coffee around the world. We will consider whether the lessons of the past can help us move to a more sustainable future.

Time: 11:30am-12:30pm

Room: 254B

Target Audience: P - Producers, R - Roasters, T- Traders, RO - Retail Operators, CE - Coffee Enthusiasts

Presenter(s): Robert Thurston, Managing Partner (and professor emeritus), Oxford Coffee Company (Miami University--Ohio) | Jonathan Morris, Research Professor in History & Vice President of the Royal Historical Society, University of Hertfordshire, UK

 
 
 

Meet the Presenters